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Ssoele

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  1. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from Ben17 in Building a NAS. How do you start? (Guide)   
    Building a NAS. How do you start? (Guide)
     
    In this topic, I will try to guide you in choosing the right hardware for your home NAS system. What is a NAS you ask? Well, just check out Wikipedia. They can explain it far better then I can.
    I am not saying that there aren't other ways to make a NAS, but this an easy way that will get you started on the hardware. There will be a FreeNAS tutorial soon by @looney on how to set up the software side.
     
    The case
    For a NAS system, you want a case that has good hard drive support.
    You want a case that supports at least 4 hard drives (and an SSD or 5 hard drives, more on this in ‘The boot drive’). You need easy access to those drives, to upgrade them, replace them or add more drives. 
     
    The CPU
    You don’t need a high-end CPU for a NAS build. A lower-end APU from AMD or a Celeron CPU from Intel is perfect in this case as you will not need an extra graphics card. Make sure your CPU supports 64-bit architectures.
     
    The Motherboard
    You want a motherboard that supports the CPU that you chose and has the possibility to use the integrated graphics of the APU/CPU. In this case, any FM1/2 or Intel H61/H71/H81, as long as it has enough SATA ports on it, with normal hard drives, SATA 2 (3Gbps) or SATA 3 (6Gbps) doesn’t really matter. Also look for a board that has Gigabit LAN.
    If you are using more than 5 hard drives for storage, an add-on HBA (Host Bus Adapter) is advised.
    Also, keep in mind, some 3rd party SATA controllers that motherboard manufacturars add to the board are not supported by FreeNAS and OS's like that.
     
    The RAM
    For an OS like FreeNAS, 8GB+ is advised if you are going to run ZFS. If you are going to use more than 8TB of storage, the general rule of thumb is 1GB for every 1TB of storage.
    The memory speed is not really of any importance here.
    If using ZFS, ECC RAM is recommended. Personally, if it fits in your budget and your hardware supports it, I'd say, go for it.

    The NIC
    If you have a motherboard that does not support gigabit speeds, or if you have a need for over gigabit speed, an add-on NIC is advised. You can pick up used Intel dual/quad Gigabit NIC’s on Ebay quite cheap (30-50USD for dual, 60-120USD for quad). I recommend using Intel NIC’s because they last forever and work on almost all OS’es.
     
    The HBA/RAID card
    If you need more SATA ports than your motherboard can deliver, you’ll need a HBA or a RIAD card.
    You have cards that have direct SATA connectors, those cards usually only go up to 4 drives. On the other hand, you have the cards that use SFF-8087 connectors. You can with a break-out cable connect up to 4 SATA drives on each SFF-8087 connector. These cards vary from 1 port up until 10 ports (40 drives).
     
    The Power supply
    The power supply is very important here, as most people underestimate how much a bad power supply can influence the life of a hard drive.
    I recommend getting a good rated power supply around 300-400W. A single rail power supply is recommended, because multi-rail power supplies often have weaker rails for SATA and Molex connectors.
    If your power supply doesn’t have enough SATA connectors, you can always use SATA power splitters or Molex to SATA power adapters.

    The boot drive
    The boot drive will have your OS on it. In the case of FreeNAS, you can either install it on a Compact Flash card, a USB stick or a small hard drive/SSD. You will need around 2GB of storage. If you use a hard drive/SSD, you will not be able to use it as a storage device. If you go with an hard drive or SSD, I would recommend getting something like a 8GB to 30 GB hard drive or SSD.

    The storage drives
    Here is where thing start to look like a real storage solution. There are a lot of drives to choose from, it is recommended to not mix and match different drives.
    Western Digital Green drives are not recommended for use in NAS systems, as they can drop out of the RAID and lose their RAID status.
    The cheapest drives that you should use in a NAS are Seagate Barracudas, they are a bit more expensive that WD Greens, but do work within a NAS.
    Alternatively, you could get Western Digital Red drives, these drives are specially engineered for use in a NAS.
     
     
     
    4-bay NAS Example build: http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/49715-example-nas-builds/?p=662704
    6-bay NAS Example build: http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/49715-example-nas-builds/?p=662705
    8-bay NAS Example build: http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/49715-example-nas-builds/?p=662706
    16-bay NAS Example build: http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/49715-example-nas-builds/?p=662707
    24-bay NAS Example build: http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/49715-example-nas-builds/?p=663165


     
    Special thanks to the following members for reviewing this post
    @Whiskers, @Samdb, @Pintend
  2. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from r2724r16 in pfSense Guide   
    I will write a guide on how to use and set up the different functions of pfSense.
    The Setup DHCP Server Static IP addresses DNS Forwarder NAT (Port Forwarding) Dynamic DNS Windows Update caching (working on it) (I am going to add more, please let me know what you want to see)


    0. Hardware
     
    You can run pfSense on a lot of devices, for ease of use, I'm doing these guides on an embedded device with a APU1D4 board with pfSense pre-installed (http://varia-store.com/Systems-with-Software/pfSense/pfSense-ready-19-system-with-APU1D4-1GHZ-Dual-Core-4GB-RAM::3159.html).
     
     
    1. The Setup
     
    1. On the first step, you just have to click .



    2. In the second step, you have to choose the hostname, domain and DNS servers of you pfSense. This is the actual name of your pfSense, if you are not setting this up in a domain, you can put whatever you want in here. If you are not setting this up in a domain, you can put whatever you want in here. network.local is an example you can pick. Your primary and secondary DNS servers are the servers your pfSense send DNS request to. You can pick for example the Google Public DNS, 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 Your primary and secondary DNS servers are the servers your pfSense send DNS request to. You can pick for example the Google Public DNS, 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 This option lets you choose if you want your ISP to be able to overwrite these DNS servers. If you have filled in everything, you can just click

    3. In this step you can set your time server and your time zone. I recommend leaving the Time server as it is and just selecting your time zone. After you've selected your time zone, click .


    4. This step is a big one, normally you don't have to set up a lot here, unless it is required by your ISP. If you have a static IP from your ISP, you might have to set up the MAC address.
    You might also have to set up the PPPoE configuration with the information you have from your ISP if you are using any xDSL kind of connection.
    After you have filled in the information (if needed), click .


    5. In this step you can set up the IP address if your pfSense, as well as the subnet mask. Generally, keep the IP 192.168.1.1 and the subnet mask at 24, unless you know what you are doing. After then, click .


    6. Fill in the password that you want to use of your machine and click .


    7. Just click here.


    8. Wait a about a minute.


    9. New the basic setup is done, you can login by filling in your username (default admin) and password and clicking .


    10. If everything is correct, it should look something like this.
  3. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from Joshua_Meunier in Network layout showoff   
    This thread is meant to show us your network layout.
     
    Some rules
    You must have a proper network diagram; Something made in Microsoft Visio, Gliffy (Free) or something similar. No all-in-one boxes; There is not much to show off if your network only has 1 networking device. It must be your own network; Don't try to impress by showing off a corporate network, we are looking for consumer networks  
     
     
    I will start off with showing my home network
     

     
    Networks
    0.x (Green, 0.0.0.0/0): This is the network directly from the modem, unfiltered. Settopboxes are set on a VLAN so they can communicate with my ISPs interactive services. 1.x (Blue, 172.16.0.0/12): This is our main network, all normal clients are connected via WiFi or on switch 1.2 and 1.3. 2.x (Orange, 192.168.0.0/16): This is our public network, everyone can connect to our public hotspot, but can't access our main network.  
    Switches
    0.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 1.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 1.2: TP-Link TL-SG2424 1.3: TP-Link TL-SG3210 2.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 Gateways
    1.1: Ubiquiti EdgeRouter ER-8, this one also does the DHCP for 1.x 2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense DHCP
    2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense DNS
    1.1: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 1.2: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense 2.2: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense Portal
    2.1: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 and acting as portal for our hotspot Access points
    1.1: Ubiquiti UniFi AP AC 1.2: Ubiquiti UniFi AP LR 1.3: Ubiquiti UniFi AP 2.1: Ubiquiti UniFi AP LR Servers:
    1.1: Custom server running Minecraft with dedicated IP 1.2: ESXi running multiple VM's 1.3: Custom server running Windows Server 2012R2 and acting as a NAS
  4. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from Joshua_Meunier in Network layout showoff   
    This thread is meant to show us your network layout.
     
    Some rules
    You must have a proper network diagram; Something made in Microsoft Visio, Gliffy (Free) or something similar. No all-in-one boxes; There is not much to show off if your network only has 1 networking device. It must be your own network; Don't try to impress by showing off a corporate network, we are looking for consumer networks  
     
     
    I will start off with showing my home network
     

     
    Networks
    0.x (Green, 0.0.0.0/0): This is the network directly from the modem, unfiltered. Settopboxes are set on a VLAN so they can communicate with my ISPs interactive services. 1.x (Blue, 172.16.0.0/12): This is our main network, all normal clients are connected via WiFi or on switch 1.2 and 1.3. 2.x (Orange, 192.168.0.0/16): This is our public network, everyone can connect to our public hotspot, but can't access our main network.  
    Switches
    0.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 1.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 1.2: TP-Link TL-SG2424 1.3: TP-Link TL-SG3210 2.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 Gateways
    1.1: Ubiquiti EdgeRouter ER-8, this one also does the DHCP for 1.x 2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense DHCP
    2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense DNS
    1.1: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 1.2: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense 2.2: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense Portal
    2.1: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 and acting as portal for our hotspot Access points
    1.1: Ubiquiti UniFi AP AC 1.2: Ubiquiti UniFi AP LR 1.3: Ubiquiti UniFi AP 2.1: Ubiquiti UniFi AP LR Servers:
    1.1: Custom server running Minecraft with dedicated IP 1.2: ESXi running multiple VM's 1.3: Custom server running Windows Server 2012R2 and acting as a NAS
  5. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from mikat in *UNOFFICIAL* LTT Community and Server Database   
    I vote @looney as Community Manager! @Windspeed36, @Whaler_99, @Slick
  6. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from Joshua_Meunier in Network layout showoff   
    This thread is meant to show us your network layout.
     
    Some rules
    You must have a proper network diagram; Something made in Microsoft Visio, Gliffy (Free) or something similar. No all-in-one boxes; There is not much to show off if your network only has 1 networking device. It must be your own network; Don't try to impress by showing off a corporate network, we are looking for consumer networks  
     
     
    I will start off with showing my home network
     

     
    Networks
    0.x (Green, 0.0.0.0/0): This is the network directly from the modem, unfiltered. Settopboxes are set on a VLAN so they can communicate with my ISPs interactive services. 1.x (Blue, 172.16.0.0/12): This is our main network, all normal clients are connected via WiFi or on switch 1.2 and 1.3. 2.x (Orange, 192.168.0.0/16): This is our public network, everyone can connect to our public hotspot, but can't access our main network.  
    Switches
    0.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 1.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 1.2: TP-Link TL-SG2424 1.3: TP-Link TL-SG3210 2.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 Gateways
    1.1: Ubiquiti EdgeRouter ER-8, this one also does the DHCP for 1.x 2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense DHCP
    2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense DNS
    1.1: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 1.2: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense 2.2: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense Portal
    2.1: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 and acting as portal for our hotspot Access points
    1.1: Ubiquiti UniFi AP AC 1.2: Ubiquiti UniFi AP LR 1.3: Ubiquiti UniFi AP 2.1: Ubiquiti UniFi AP LR Servers:
    1.1: Custom server running Minecraft with dedicated IP 1.2: ESXi running multiple VM's 1.3: Custom server running Windows Server 2012R2 and acting as a NAS
  7. Informative
    Ssoele got a reaction from veldora in Anime Club - Heaven Society   
    I liked it, except for the ending, felt really forced.
  8. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from Phorlorn in Network layout showoff   
    They are 2 separate networks, with different DHCP servers and different IP-ranges, connecting them would cause clients from 1.x to get IP's in the range of 2.x and vice-versa.
  9. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from Daniel Z. in How to become moderator?   
    If you have to ask to be a mod, you will not be one.
     
    How to become a moderator:
    Follow the CoC Help other people Be friendly Don't be an ass Help other people If you do those things, you might have a slight chance that you are picked, but it is VERY unlikely.
  10. Agree
    Ssoele got a reaction from ComputerBoss in Network layout showoff   
    Consumer routers can be a pain to work with, they often do stuff you don't want them to do, or vice-versa.
  11. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from Joshua_Meunier in Network layout showoff   
    This thread is meant to show us your network layout.
     
    Some rules
    You must have a proper network diagram; Something made in Microsoft Visio, Gliffy (Free) or something similar. No all-in-one boxes; There is not much to show off if your network only has 1 networking device. It must be your own network; Don't try to impress by showing off a corporate network, we are looking for consumer networks  
     
     
    I will start off with showing my home network
     

     
    Networks
    0.x (Green, 0.0.0.0/0): This is the network directly from the modem, unfiltered. Settopboxes are set on a VLAN so they can communicate with my ISPs interactive services. 1.x (Blue, 172.16.0.0/12): This is our main network, all normal clients are connected via WiFi or on switch 1.2 and 1.3. 2.x (Orange, 192.168.0.0/16): This is our public network, everyone can connect to our public hotspot, but can't access our main network.  
    Switches
    0.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 1.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 1.2: TP-Link TL-SG2424 1.3: TP-Link TL-SG3210 2.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 Gateways
    1.1: Ubiquiti EdgeRouter ER-8, this one also does the DHCP for 1.x 2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense DHCP
    2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense DNS
    1.1: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 1.2: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense 2.2: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense Portal
    2.1: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 and acting as portal for our hotspot Access points
    1.1: Ubiquiti UniFi AP AC 1.2: Ubiquiti UniFi AP LR 1.3: Ubiquiti UniFi AP 2.1: Ubiquiti UniFi AP LR Servers:
    1.1: Custom server running Minecraft with dedicated IP 1.2: ESXi running multiple VM's 1.3: Custom server running Windows Server 2012R2 and acting as a NAS
  12. Agree
    Ssoele got a reaction from ComputerBoss in Network layout showoff   
    Consumer routers can be a pain to work with, they often do stuff you don't want them to do, or vice-versa.
  13. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from Joshua_Meunier in Setting up a Ubiquiti UniFi Access Point [Guide]   
    Ubiquiti is a company that makes low cost easy to use enterprise network equipment. Their UniFi line of products is wireless aimed at prosumers and enterprises. Their interface is easy to use and expendable.
    1. The units
    1.1. Indoor Units
    1.2. Outdoor Units
    1.3. A closer look at the UniFi AP
    2. Installation and Configuration
    2.1. Hardware Side
    2.2. Software Side
    2.2.1. Controller
    2.2.1.1. Controller Installation
    2.2.1.2. Controller Software
    2.2.2. Control Panel
    2.2.2.1. Control Panel - Setup
    2.2.2.2. Control Panel - Using it
    2.2.2.3. Control Panel - Adding an AP
    3. Conclusion
     
    1. The units
     
    Ubiquiti has a few different kinds of Wireless Access Points:
     
     
    1.1. Indoor units
     
    UniFi AP
    Range: ~ 122m / 400ft Bands: 2.4GHz Standards: 802.11 b/g/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 60 EUR / 50 GBP / 80 USD UniFi AP LR Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 2.4GHz Standards: 802.11 b/g/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 75 EUR / 60 GBP / 105 USD UniFi AP Pro Range: ~ 122m / 400ft Bands: 2.4GHz, 5GHz Standards: 802.11 a/b/g/n Speeds: 450Mbps (2.4GHz), 300Mbps (5GHz) Price*: ~ 190 EUR / 160 GBP / 265 USD UniFi AP AC Range: ~ 122m / 400ft Bands: 2.4GHz, 5GHz Standards: 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac Speeds: 450Mbps (2.4GHz), 1300Mbps (5GHz) Price*: ~ 265 EUR / 220 GBP / 365 USD 1.2. Outdoor units  
    UniFi AP Outdoor
    Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 2.4GHz Standards: 802.11 b/g/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 110 EUR / 95 GBP / 155 USD Replaced by the Outdoor+, but still available UniFi AP Outdoor (5G) Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 5GHz Standards: 802.11 a/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 110 EUR / 95 GBP / 155 USD UniFi AP Outdoor+ Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 2.4GHz Standards: 802.11 b/g/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 135 EUR / 115 GBP / 185 USD UniFi AP AC Outdoor Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 2.4GHz, 5GHz Standards: 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac Speeds: 450Mbps (2.4GHz), 1300Mbps (5GHz) Price*: ~ 415 EUR / 350 GBP / 575 USD * Prices are taking from Varia Store with 19% VAT.  
    1.3. A closer look at the UniFi AP
    The unit has a clean look at the top, other then the LED ring, there is not much to see.
    At the back, we find the sticker with the serial number, the Ethernet connector and a reset button.

     
     
    2. Installation and Configuration
     
    2.1. Hardware Side
     
    The installation of the unit is very easy, plug the cable from the Access Point into the POE injector, plug the POE injector into your network and plug the POE injector into a wall socket.

     
     
    2.2. Software Side
     
    The software side is also very easy. You need a system that will run the controller software, this system does not need to be online all the time, only when you want to edit something to your access point(s).
     
    2.2.1. Controller
    2.2.1.1. Controller Installation
     
    Installing the controller software is easy and goes fast.

    2.2.1.2. Controller Software
    To access the control panel, you need to run the UniFi software.

    2.2.2. Control Panel
    2.2.2.1. Control Panel - Setup
    Once the software is running, you can go to https://127.0.0.1:8443/
    On first run, you will get to see this setup.
    First you select your language and country, then you select your access point(s), then your SSID (name of your WiFi) and the password, you also have the option to have a second WiFi network, just for guests, but we are not going in depth on that here. And finally, you choose your admin username and password.

    2.2.2.2. Control Panel - Using it
    After you finished the setup you can login into the control panel.
    You will see a map of a house, you can upload your own floor plan or get your house on Google Maps or you can just stick with this and don't bother.
    You can see your Access Point(s) at the left side, you can drag them on the map to place them.
    You can check the Statistics tab to see usage statistics of your Access Points over time.
    You can also see a list of your Access Points and of the connected users (with usage).

    2.2.2.3. Control Panel - Adding an AP
    To add another Access Point to your network, you simply connect it to your network. Then go into your control panel, you will see at the top that 1 Access Point is pending. Simply click on it and it will open the window for that AP. Simply click Adopt at the bottom, wait a few minutes and you are done. You can add an alias to an AP so you know which is which.

     
    3. Conclusion
    I am very impressed by the ease of use of the units and the price point that are at (especially the lower end models). I have been using them now for about 3 months and I haven't had any problems so far. The throughput of these units is also impressive, I'm getting quite a bit more then the AP's I was using before. The only thing I was not so impressed with was the range, it is good, but not the range I had hoped for. 1 unit is indeed enough for our household to have coverage everywhere, but not with the throughput I would have wanted. I placed 2 extra AP's in the house and now it is a lot better.
    If you have questions about this guide, feel free to ask them. I will in the near future so a similar guide for the Ubiquiti EdgeRouters series and the Ubiquiti AirVision series, but I am still waiting for it to arrive.
  14. Agree
    Ssoele got a reaction from ComputerBoss in Network layout showoff   
    Consumer routers can be a pain to work with, they often do stuff you don't want them to do, or vice-versa.
  15. Agree
    Ssoele got a reaction from ComputerBoss in Network layout showoff   
    Consumer routers can be a pain to work with, they often do stuff you don't want them to do, or vice-versa.
  16. Like
    Ssoele reacted to EChondo in Bye   
    Hello Trikein,
     
    While we understand that for whatever reason you want to leave the linustechtips.com community forum, creating a thread announcing your departure only creates unnecessary drama when and if you ever decide to return.
     
    If the purpose of your post was to send feedback to the administration and moderation team, then please PM an admin or a moderator with your feedback or post it in the official forum suggestions sub-forum here: https://linustechtips.com/main/forum/81-feature-suggestions/
     
    Locked
  17. Agree
    Ssoele reacted to Windspeed36 in Popcorn Time Legit?   
    Locked - illegal torrents site.
  18. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from leadeater in LACP in Windows 10   
    From what I've read, Samba 4.1 does not yet support SMB3 multichannel.
  19. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from leadeater in LACP in Windows 10   
    LACP only works if you have multiple data streams, so if you only test desktop > server, you will still have only 1GbE (SMB 2 only supports 1 stream, SMB 3 can work with multiple).
    FreeNAS does not support SMB 3.0, so you can't take advantage of the multiple streams.
     
    The only thing that can give you greater speeds is upgrading to 10GbE.
  20. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from Joshua_Meunier in Setting up a Ubiquiti UniFi Access Point [Guide]   
    Ubiquiti is a company that makes low cost easy to use enterprise network equipment. Their UniFi line of products is wireless aimed at prosumers and enterprises. Their interface is easy to use and expendable.
    1. The units
    1.1. Indoor Units
    1.2. Outdoor Units
    1.3. A closer look at the UniFi AP
    2. Installation and Configuration
    2.1. Hardware Side
    2.2. Software Side
    2.2.1. Controller
    2.2.1.1. Controller Installation
    2.2.1.2. Controller Software
    2.2.2. Control Panel
    2.2.2.1. Control Panel - Setup
    2.2.2.2. Control Panel - Using it
    2.2.2.3. Control Panel - Adding an AP
    3. Conclusion
     
    1. The units
     
    Ubiquiti has a few different kinds of Wireless Access Points:
     
     
    1.1. Indoor units
     
    UniFi AP
    Range: ~ 122m / 400ft Bands: 2.4GHz Standards: 802.11 b/g/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 60 EUR / 50 GBP / 80 USD UniFi AP LR Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 2.4GHz Standards: 802.11 b/g/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 75 EUR / 60 GBP / 105 USD UniFi AP Pro Range: ~ 122m / 400ft Bands: 2.4GHz, 5GHz Standards: 802.11 a/b/g/n Speeds: 450Mbps (2.4GHz), 300Mbps (5GHz) Price*: ~ 190 EUR / 160 GBP / 265 USD UniFi AP AC Range: ~ 122m / 400ft Bands: 2.4GHz, 5GHz Standards: 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac Speeds: 450Mbps (2.4GHz), 1300Mbps (5GHz) Price*: ~ 265 EUR / 220 GBP / 365 USD 1.2. Outdoor units  
    UniFi AP Outdoor
    Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 2.4GHz Standards: 802.11 b/g/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 110 EUR / 95 GBP / 155 USD Replaced by the Outdoor+, but still available UniFi AP Outdoor (5G) Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 5GHz Standards: 802.11 a/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 110 EUR / 95 GBP / 155 USD UniFi AP Outdoor+ Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 2.4GHz Standards: 802.11 b/g/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 135 EUR / 115 GBP / 185 USD UniFi AP AC Outdoor Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 2.4GHz, 5GHz Standards: 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac Speeds: 450Mbps (2.4GHz), 1300Mbps (5GHz) Price*: ~ 415 EUR / 350 GBP / 575 USD * Prices are taking from Varia Store with 19% VAT.  
    1.3. A closer look at the UniFi AP
    The unit has a clean look at the top, other then the LED ring, there is not much to see.
    At the back, we find the sticker with the serial number, the Ethernet connector and a reset button.

     
     
    2. Installation and Configuration
     
    2.1. Hardware Side
     
    The installation of the unit is very easy, plug the cable from the Access Point into the POE injector, plug the POE injector into your network and plug the POE injector into a wall socket.

     
     
    2.2. Software Side
     
    The software side is also very easy. You need a system that will run the controller software, this system does not need to be online all the time, only when you want to edit something to your access point(s).
     
    2.2.1. Controller
    2.2.1.1. Controller Installation
     
    Installing the controller software is easy and goes fast.

    2.2.1.2. Controller Software
    To access the control panel, you need to run the UniFi software.

    2.2.2. Control Panel
    2.2.2.1. Control Panel - Setup
    Once the software is running, you can go to https://127.0.0.1:8443/
    On first run, you will get to see this setup.
    First you select your language and country, then you select your access point(s), then your SSID (name of your WiFi) and the password, you also have the option to have a second WiFi network, just for guests, but we are not going in depth on that here. And finally, you choose your admin username and password.

    2.2.2.2. Control Panel - Using it
    After you finished the setup you can login into the control panel.
    You will see a map of a house, you can upload your own floor plan or get your house on Google Maps or you can just stick with this and don't bother.
    You can see your Access Point(s) at the left side, you can drag them on the map to place them.
    You can check the Statistics tab to see usage statistics of your Access Points over time.
    You can also see a list of your Access Points and of the connected users (with usage).

    2.2.2.3. Control Panel - Adding an AP
    To add another Access Point to your network, you simply connect it to your network. Then go into your control panel, you will see at the top that 1 Access Point is pending. Simply click on it and it will open the window for that AP. Simply click Adopt at the bottom, wait a few minutes and you are done. You can add an alias to an AP so you know which is which.

     
    3. Conclusion
    I am very impressed by the ease of use of the units and the price point that are at (especially the lower end models). I have been using them now for about 3 months and I haven't had any problems so far. The throughput of these units is also impressive, I'm getting quite a bit more then the AP's I was using before. The only thing I was not so impressed with was the range, it is good, but not the range I had hoped for. 1 unit is indeed enough for our household to have coverage everywhere, but not with the throughput I would have wanted. I placed 2 extra AP's in the house and now it is a lot better.
    If you have questions about this guide, feel free to ask them. I will in the near future so a similar guide for the Ubiquiti EdgeRouters series and the Ubiquiti AirVision series, but I am still waiting for it to arrive.
  21. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from NinjaJc01 in USB3_12 vs USB3_34   
    Does not matter, they are the same.
    _12 stands for port 1 and 2
    _34 stands for port 3 and 4
  22. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from Joshua_Meunier in Setting up a Ubiquiti UniFi Access Point [Guide]   
    Ubiquiti is a company that makes low cost easy to use enterprise network equipment. Their UniFi line of products is wireless aimed at prosumers and enterprises. Their interface is easy to use and expendable.
    1. The units
    1.1. Indoor Units
    1.2. Outdoor Units
    1.3. A closer look at the UniFi AP
    2. Installation and Configuration
    2.1. Hardware Side
    2.2. Software Side
    2.2.1. Controller
    2.2.1.1. Controller Installation
    2.2.1.2. Controller Software
    2.2.2. Control Panel
    2.2.2.1. Control Panel - Setup
    2.2.2.2. Control Panel - Using it
    2.2.2.3. Control Panel - Adding an AP
    3. Conclusion
     
    1. The units
     
    Ubiquiti has a few different kinds of Wireless Access Points:
     
     
    1.1. Indoor units
     
    UniFi AP
    Range: ~ 122m / 400ft Bands: 2.4GHz Standards: 802.11 b/g/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 60 EUR / 50 GBP / 80 USD UniFi AP LR Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 2.4GHz Standards: 802.11 b/g/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 75 EUR / 60 GBP / 105 USD UniFi AP Pro Range: ~ 122m / 400ft Bands: 2.4GHz, 5GHz Standards: 802.11 a/b/g/n Speeds: 450Mbps (2.4GHz), 300Mbps (5GHz) Price*: ~ 190 EUR / 160 GBP / 265 USD UniFi AP AC Range: ~ 122m / 400ft Bands: 2.4GHz, 5GHz Standards: 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac Speeds: 450Mbps (2.4GHz), 1300Mbps (5GHz) Price*: ~ 265 EUR / 220 GBP / 365 USD 1.2. Outdoor units  
    UniFi AP Outdoor
    Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 2.4GHz Standards: 802.11 b/g/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 110 EUR / 95 GBP / 155 USD Replaced by the Outdoor+, but still available UniFi AP Outdoor (5G) Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 5GHz Standards: 802.11 a/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 110 EUR / 95 GBP / 155 USD UniFi AP Outdoor+ Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 2.4GHz Standards: 802.11 b/g/n Speeds: 300Mbps Price*: ~ 135 EUR / 115 GBP / 185 USD UniFi AP AC Outdoor Range: ~ 183m / 600ft Bands: 2.4GHz, 5GHz Standards: 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac Speeds: 450Mbps (2.4GHz), 1300Mbps (5GHz) Price*: ~ 415 EUR / 350 GBP / 575 USD * Prices are taking from Varia Store with 19% VAT.  
    1.3. A closer look at the UniFi AP
    The unit has a clean look at the top, other then the LED ring, there is not much to see.
    At the back, we find the sticker with the serial number, the Ethernet connector and a reset button.

     
     
    2. Installation and Configuration
     
    2.1. Hardware Side
     
    The installation of the unit is very easy, plug the cable from the Access Point into the POE injector, plug the POE injector into your network and plug the POE injector into a wall socket.

     
     
    2.2. Software Side
     
    The software side is also very easy. You need a system that will run the controller software, this system does not need to be online all the time, only when you want to edit something to your access point(s).
     
    2.2.1. Controller
    2.2.1.1. Controller Installation
     
    Installing the controller software is easy and goes fast.

    2.2.1.2. Controller Software
    To access the control panel, you need to run the UniFi software.

    2.2.2. Control Panel
    2.2.2.1. Control Panel - Setup
    Once the software is running, you can go to https://127.0.0.1:8443/
    On first run, you will get to see this setup.
    First you select your language and country, then you select your access point(s), then your SSID (name of your WiFi) and the password, you also have the option to have a second WiFi network, just for guests, but we are not going in depth on that here. And finally, you choose your admin username and password.

    2.2.2.2. Control Panel - Using it
    After you finished the setup you can login into the control panel.
    You will see a map of a house, you can upload your own floor plan or get your house on Google Maps or you can just stick with this and don't bother.
    You can see your Access Point(s) at the left side, you can drag them on the map to place them.
    You can check the Statistics tab to see usage statistics of your Access Points over time.
    You can also see a list of your Access Points and of the connected users (with usage).

    2.2.2.3. Control Panel - Adding an AP
    To add another Access Point to your network, you simply connect it to your network. Then go into your control panel, you will see at the top that 1 Access Point is pending. Simply click on it and it will open the window for that AP. Simply click Adopt at the bottom, wait a few minutes and you are done. You can add an alias to an AP so you know which is which.

     
    3. Conclusion
    I am very impressed by the ease of use of the units and the price point that are at (especially the lower end models). I have been using them now for about 3 months and I haven't had any problems so far. The throughput of these units is also impressive, I'm getting quite a bit more then the AP's I was using before. The only thing I was not so impressed with was the range, it is good, but not the range I had hoped for. 1 unit is indeed enough for our household to have coverage everywhere, but not with the throughput I would have wanted. I placed 2 extra AP's in the house and now it is a lot better.
    If you have questions about this guide, feel free to ask them. I will in the near future so a similar guide for the Ubiquiti EdgeRouters series and the Ubiquiti AirVision series, but I am still waiting for it to arrive.
  23. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from Joshua_Meunier in Network layout showoff   
    This thread is meant to show us your network layout.
     
    Some rules
    You must have a proper network diagram; Something made in Microsoft Visio, Gliffy (Free) or something similar. No all-in-one boxes; There is not much to show off if your network only has 1 networking device. It must be your own network; Don't try to impress by showing off a corporate network, we are looking for consumer networks  
     
     
    I will start off with showing my home network
     

     
    Networks
    0.x (Green, 0.0.0.0/0): This is the network directly from the modem, unfiltered. Settopboxes are set on a VLAN so they can communicate with my ISPs interactive services. 1.x (Blue, 172.16.0.0/12): This is our main network, all normal clients are connected via WiFi or on switch 1.2 and 1.3. 2.x (Orange, 192.168.0.0/16): This is our public network, everyone can connect to our public hotspot, but can't access our main network.  
    Switches
    0.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 1.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 1.2: TP-Link TL-SG2424 1.3: TP-Link TL-SG3210 2.1: TP-Link TL-SG3424 Gateways
    1.1: Ubiquiti EdgeRouter ER-8, this one also does the DHCP for 1.x 2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense DHCP
    2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense DNS
    1.1: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 1.2: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 2.1: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense 2.2: Embedded system based on a APU1C4 running PFSense Portal
    2.1: Supermicro server running Windows Server 2012R2 and acting as portal for our hotspot Access points
    1.1: Ubiquiti UniFi AP AC 1.2: Ubiquiti UniFi AP LR 1.3: Ubiquiti UniFi AP 2.1: Ubiquiti UniFi AP LR Servers:
    1.1: Custom server running Minecraft with dedicated IP 1.2: ESXi running multiple VM's 1.3: Custom server running Windows Server 2012R2 and acting as a NAS
  24. Like
    Ssoele reacted to Vitalius in Max Network Speed?   
    Your ISP gives you 15 Megabits per second down and 2 Megabits per second up (Mbps). 
    You are getting 1.8-2 Megabytes per second down on apps such as steam (MBps). 
    They're two different things. There are 8 Megabits in 1 Megabyte. So if your ISP were giving you 16 Megabits per second, Steam would show you as downloading at 2 Megabytes per second (because 16 Megabits = 2 Megabytes). 
  25. Like
    Ssoele got a reaction from mikat in *UNOFFICIAL* LTT Community and Server Database   
    I vote @looney as Community Manager! @Windspeed36, @Whaler_99, @Slick
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