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The Microbiome

floofer

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A Brief Overview of my Insights on the Microbiome. 

 

It is becoming more and more apparent in this day and age where we are starting to see more revelations regarding the impact of one's microfauna on things, such as from the digestive system, to the nerve system. I would like to make it clear that there is indeed quite a large relationship between the bacteria, and other microorganisms that live on us, and bodily processes. This however is most prominently due to evolution. 

 

In nature we understand that two species can live in symbiosis with one another to varying degrees. There are often symbioses seen on Norweigan Lobsters that are implicated in a healthy oral cavity for that individual, while the symbiotic gets a lovely, easy meal out of it. Our microfauna is a little bit like that. We have evolved through diets over the ages, and prominently the bacteria in our gut have assisted this process. In essence we cannot have a full diet without these bacteria, and those bacteria may be quite niche to our gut. 

 

This points to a large dependence on the bacteria, not for their presence, but rather the processes these bacteria will endure in our gut, for instance in the digestion of certain grains, the bacteria will digest the grains, and we are able to assimilate the products of that digestion. 

 

Before we start going all over the place with how important this symbiosis is, it is further more important to find the underlying processes. We are not depending on our microbiome, nor is our microbiome dependent on us - scientists are often tooting their own horn about this subject at this time. The recent faecal transplant method is indeed a treatment for someone with an "unbalanced" microbiome that will ensure the problem is remedied. A rather disgusting solution no matter how you put it, indeed one of the many things that separates us from Rabbits, is that we do not eat our own feaces, lest someone else's. A more appropriate response is to culture both a healthy gut microbiome and a seemingly damaged gut microbiome, and see which are the process that are needed. For instance if someone has trouble digesting lactose due to their microbiome, do we give them a faecal transplant or simply introduce the appropriate bacteria - or indeed simply introduce lactase into their system.  

 

This is part of the reason why I have a problem with all these microbiome studies. No one person's microbiome is the same, however we can all have healthy or bad microbiomes. Scientists treat the microbiome essentially like it is part of you, that is not true. 



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This is part of the reason why I have a problem with all these microbiome studies. No one person's microbiome is the same, however we can all have healthy or bad microbiomes. Scientists treat the microbiome essentially like it is part of you, that is not true. 

This is why personalized medicine is growing traction. Why is it some people respond to probiotic therapy while others don’t. Same goes for cancer immunotherapy where some people with refractory stage 4 cancer respond to dendritic/NK cell immunotherapy while others do not. 

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On 3/14/2019 at 11:03 PM, captain_to_fire said:

This is why personalized medicine is growing traction. Why is it some people respond to probiotic therapy while others don’t. Same goes for cancer immunotherapy where some people with refractory stage 4 cancer respond to dendritic/NK cell immunotherapy while others do not. 

That’s a good couple of questions. It is rather simple that individuals may not have the microbes amenable to that probiotic, or the immunotherapy was done incorrectly. 

 

The fact is, especially for probiotics, we don’t have enough to speculate fully on its potential. Car T-cell therapy is only just being carried out in New Zealand, and it is quite a costly therapy.

 

Studies for the microbiome are one thing, but access to amenable therapies is quite another. Without access we can’t get good enough data. 

 

Im typing this out on my phone so sorry if it’s all a bit obvious and simple. I’ll be home next weekend where I’ll share a tidbit from a revolutionary new bit of tech that will help on that respect of data.

 

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