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    One rule: keep it on the CPU, no drivers, and no internet/browser stuff. All I have is a MacBook Pro Retina with a 750M inside, and none of the enterprise tools to handle validation.

  1. Loungin was the third and final single released for LL Cool J's sixth album, Mr. Smith. Released on June 25th, 1996, it proved to be a large smash, thanks to the remix produced by the Trackmasters and featuring Total on the chorus.

    The song is, very simply, LL finessing a woman in a loveless relationship with another man. Sampling Bernard Wright's 1985 hit Who Do You Love? (which focused on a topic not unlike LL's I Need Love), its instrumental is still one of the best aged ones.

    sFGeA.JPG

  2. I haven't done anything that would require benchmarking in ages. Last change made to my old log file was 2014 after I changed some case fans and wanted to check if they did something to temps. This July I changed graphics card which is something I would say anyone should run their own sequence after. So after any bigger change (CPU/GPU mainly) anyone should run same benchmarks they have run before change. I will come back to this in a moment. In my situation need was really big. I went from 2011 midrange card to 2013 top end card. Something that in paper is bit better than 280X, card that I was eyeing for upgrade year ago. Yes, talking about used cards. Upgrade was from GTX 560Ti factory OC'd to reference GTX 780. Benchmarks would look awesome. In numbers if not actually, but thats more about nature of tests themselves.

     

    So why this post? Well, so I can refer to it when someone asks advice about benchmarking. Since my last run was 3 years ago and I haven't really played any new games, all my game benchmarks are pretty bad choices. Like NFS Shift and Battlefield Bad Company 2. There might be Battlefield 3, but thats it. This new batch won't have any real gameplay. Because of two reasons. 1. I still lack good games for realistic benchmarking, Battlefield 4 is probably on the heavier side. So nah on games. And 2. I don't want to buy games just because I could get good benchmark out of them. Even games with benchmark tools would be just for it since I don't play 3rd person single player adventure/action games (Metro 2033, Tomb Raider, Witcher 3). This will be list of benchmarks which are free and provide good base for anyone looking to create their own sequence.

     

    1. What is my "sequence"?

     

    I use term "sequence" to describe procedure where I run multiple tests, check temps and mark down scores. Marking down scores and temps is good practice in general. Not just for bragging, but to check how much you spending money actually improves the systems performance. So my sequence involves having few monitoring software open, taking numbers in notepad and running several benchmarks one by one. Yes, it will take some time, some 1.5h for me. But you need to do it once and then you can just refer notes later if someone asks something. I've used temp readings many times to advice on high temps under stress tests and idles on my older hardware.

     

    To actual point. I have 10 software, 12 tests, 1 main monitoring software with 2 others running, notepad with template for scores and temps and FRAPS for one odd out fps reading. I cover tests later. I happen to have 2 monitors, but all this can be done on one monitor. 2nd is good for having all monitoring software there. Like in this manor:

    2nd_monitoring.thumb.png.1795b7d076ff4785661f9d97cdad8fb1.png

     

    So MSI Afterburner is present because of habit of looking at graphs. I actually don't use it for GPU temp monitoring anymore, but habit of looking at fan and temp graphs remains. Main screen is where I look at GPU temp when test is running. Mainly since its new piece and I want to see how my fan settings are holding. Main software here is RealTemp with GPU temp monitoring open. I reset Maximum readings after every test to get reliable readings for all tests individually. Under them all is my normal main monitoring software, OpenHardwareMonitor. Notepad is on main monitor since I don't need it until after test finishes.

     

    Things I do and would recommend. I have habit of doing this after cold boot. I would recommend booting before running sequence. Its easiest way, since there's least amount of extra software running on background. For this sequence I added way of closing all extra stuff I have open. Skype, several driver software's, basically anything except multimonitor manager, fan controls and virus scanner. Some might close virus scanner too, but I don't mind it. Then another boot after all testing is done. To get everything working as normal. I would recommend setting any fan profiles like you are going to use them before running test on new components. Makes more realistic comparison. As for temps, I have idle's. Which I will take after first test has run. Reason being that idle's coming directly from boot will be lower than what you are going to see any other time. For testing temps I use max temp. Its most relevant. Since RealTemp shows temps for all cores, I use average with easy count. Take highest and lowest and split difference with upward rounding. Like 66C and 58C would be 62C (8/2=4, 58+4=62C) or 67C and 60C would be 64C (7/2=3.5, round up 4).

     

    2. Tests and score keeping

     

    Let's start with synthetic benchmarks. I will give some background on why I use software listed here, where to get it and what settings to use (if needed).

     

    3DMark https://www.futuremark.com/downloads/3dmark.zip

    If you have had gaming PC for some time, you know this software already. Futuremark's (Yay! for Finnish company) 3DMark has been industry standard for almost 20 years. Its combined benchmark, meaning that it tests both GPU and CPU within single run. First 3DMark I've used is 3DMark03. I've had 05, 06. Vantage and 11. 3DMark06 was used for long time because of its DX9 support. Until Vantage with DX10.1 it was only thing to test new hardware reliably. Thats important. Because of the way benchmarks work, if you change something the score will also differ. So comparing two results between different versions of software can cause issues. I first noticed this fact with FurMark.

     

    But back to 3DMark. Free version has 3-4 tests. Most common is FireStrike which is for current gen gaming PCs. You can run it with lower end hardware if you are like me and want before upgrade scores to compare. I also used tad lighter SkyDiver. Mainly because I couldn't get 06 running anymore. So let both tests run, mark score to notepad, mark max temps for GPU and CPU, remember to let temps go back to "idle" in between and reset max readings before running the test. Thats it. Free version doesn't have any settings to toggle. Only thing I would like to toggle is Demo.

     

    CINEBENCH R15

    Yes, they actually have product name in caps. Maxon makes professional 3D modeling and animation software as their main source of income. But Cinebench has become one reason for their homepage to get constant traffic. It has 2 tests, individually for CPU and GPU. GPU uses OpenCL, CPU renders image using all available threads. Cinebench gives some comparison for similar systems, but I wouldn't look that graph too much. I also don't think it as very taxing software. Run tests for both CPU and GPU, with temp normalization in between.

     

    This is among those software with this batch that has single part focus on testing. I don't have just for CPU, but I might look into that part more. Intel Extreme Tuning Utility has CPU testing, but I don't know if it works with AMD. Anyway, having whole benchmark just for single component has some advantages. Like if you'd like to test air cooling myth about radiating GPU heat. So running GPU only test would raise only GPUs temp notably and do something to CPUs temp also. I don't look at utilization when I run these tests, but it could be one thing to check also if you want to gather more data.

     

    Catzilla http://www.catzilla.com/download

    ALLBenchmark's test is different from the two above because it  has very noticeable sound effects and music. Otherwise its just another combined benchmark. I've used it since I heard about it from OC3D's TinyTomLogan. TTL is someone who's opinion on OC and CPU performance means a lot to me. I've picked other go-to software from him with OCCT, a stress test software for CPU. But back to Catzilla. Basic version only has 540p benchmark, but you get 720p one by creating account to their site. Easy thing with Google, Twitter or Facebook linking. Rest of the stuff is like before.

     

    RealBench https://rog.asus.com/rog-pro/realbench-v2-leaderboard/

    ASUS' RealBench is combined test which uses real life tasks for benchmarking. Image manipulation, rendering, video encoding and multitasking. Besides giving total score, you get score per test. I mark all of them down. I got to see how much GPU did bottleneck CPU on CPU heavy tasks. Result? Not that much. But some.

     

    UserBenchmark

    This is new to my lineup. I haven't looked much into what it actually measures. But looks to be lighter side combined test. I would say it replaces Novabench I had on earlier lineup. Results are given in three categories, for Gaming, Desktop and Workstation in percentage. I marked those percentages as results.

     

    Heaven and Valley

    These two from Unigine are pure GPU tests. Heaven is what is commonly used for GPU OC testing, temp testing and benchmarking by reviewers. Valley is bit heavier, so I'd say running them both is good practice. Like with 3DMark, there are more tests you can use. I used highest presets for both, Extreme for Heaven and ExtremeHD for Valley.

     

    FFXIV: Stormblood

    Like said earlier, I don't have real gameplay benchmarks in this set. So this game from 2013 is lower end gaming benchmark for me. It has preset for Mazximum settings, but I pumped those bit more. You can check my settings from PDF attached. I use score as scoring, but you could have also given FPS.

    (FFXIV_Stormbloo_benchmark_LoGiCalDrm_config.pdf)

     

    Star Swarm http://store.steampowered.com/app/267130/Star_Swarm_Stress_Test/

    This game engine benchmark is free on Steam. Released 2014 by Oxide Games, guys behind Ashes of Singularity, its has capability of simulating space battle game. There are few options to simulate different style of games. I used Attract with Extreme settings. Score will be given as average FPS. You can select some other combination, important part being that same settings are used before and after any upgrade made to keep score consistent.

     

    demo2 https://files.scene.org/view/parties/2015/assembly15/demo/demo2_by_ekspert.zip

    This one is something I cooked up. Its newer than both other gaming style benchmarks, its done with Unreal Engine 4 and I have no clue if it has any relation to real world or not. Its Demo made by group called Ekspert for Assembly LAN Demo Compo 2015, in which it placed 2nd. There are few remarks I want to make about demo's and demoscene before going actual benchmarking part. Demoscene is all about digital art. Animation, coding, graphics, music, indie game development. At least in Europe, many software and game dev companies have their roots deep into demoscene. If you are doing the things I mentioned above and want to show off your skills by competing, maybe look if there are parties/compo's held in your area. The two known Finnish companies with demoscene background are Futuremark (surprise, surprise) and Rovio. One for making first PC demo at the time when Amiga and Commodore 64 were main platforms, other for making mobile game back when those were played on Nokia N-Cage's.

     

    Now back to benchmarking part. Demo2 doesn't have built-in scoring system. So I've used FRAPS to calculate average FPS. Running 1080p version gives warning about using Fraps for recording purposes, but loads just fine after that. I start benchmark counter as soon as demo starts and check scores afterwards. Nothing more to it.

     

    Others?

    As I said along the lines, I would like to have more modern game benchmarks, as well as CPU only benchmark. So I will be looking around for those and adding them here. If someone reading this has ideas about free or cheap games with included benchmarks, please let me know.

     

    3. Scores and comparison

     

    At this point you should have raw data text file. Something like this one I'm using:

    benchmsrk.txt

    Which includes system specs for each test cycle. This would be the file you are updating during tests. Feel free to use it as template or comparison. But what now? Well, you can just compare by eye results, use it to quickly refer temps and so on. But what if you want know how much better system performance is after upgrade. Thats where Excel (or Sheets, Calc and so on) comes in. Copying results to Excel (&co) can be annoying, but do it once to get template correct and maybe adjust .txt file to help in future. Here's my .xlsx for reference. Also free to be used as template or comparison:

    benchmark_LoGiCalDrm.xlsx

     

    In file I've got some extended system info and notes about tests. Which are pretty much same as in here. But main thing is +- column (Excel hint: add < ' > in front of symbol to exclude any automatic formula). It calculates how many percentage better new score is compared to last. Works best when score changes less than 100% or new score is over twice the value of old. Formula used is pretty simple:

    =(<new>/<old>)-1

    Shown in percentage. You can add color coding and such if needed. If new value are over twice bigger, remove <-1> to get accurate score.

     

    There's some oddness in that file in CPU temps. I had issue with Speedfan missing fan profiles for 2 front intakes. Which I fixed after I had changed to new GPU. So those are something to ignore.

     

    4. Conclusion

     

    I hope this helps those who are new to benchmarking. Note that this is just how I do things and you should be taking it as guide or advice. Make it your own. I will be doing some fixes along the lines, but as I will not be getting major upgrade in few years, its quite possible I'll be making another batch of tests when next upgrade is on me.

  3. Previously all blue CS Go inventory 

     

    Glock - Blue Fizzure

    USP S - Royal Blue

    P250 - Valence

    Dual Barettas - Urban Shock

    Deagle - Cobalt Disruption

    Tec9 - Avalanche (Ice Cap released after I sold everything, read Pt2) 

    FiveSeven - Fowl Play

     

    Mac10 - Indigo

    MP9 - Pandora's Box 

    UMP45 - Minotaur's Labyrinth 

    P90 - Module 

    PPBizon - Blue Streak

    MP7 - Anodized Navy

     

    M4A1S - Icarus Fell

    AK47 - Frontside Misty

    GalilAR - Stone Cold

    Famas - Cyanospatter

    AWP - Corticera

    Scout - Abbyss

    SG - Anodized Navy

    AUG - Ricochet 

    Auto G3SG1 - Demeter

    Auto SCAR20 - Grotto

     

    Nova - Tempest

    XM2014 - Varicamo Blue

    MAG7 - Cobalt Core

    SawedOff - Serenity

    M249 - Shipping Forecast 

    Negev - Terrain

     

    Knife - Gut Knife Doppler Phase 4

     

    I just unboxed a knife and used all money in that

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    Who here has seen dennisforwanshow.com ??

  4. This post might be more popular with the older crowd. Many of these items were in a moving box within smaller boxes, this ended up being a mess to sort through for disposal and potential re-use. Decided upon less photos as some vintage computing users might go nuts seeing a stack of 5.25 floppies in a disposal pile. I don't throw out failed 5.25 floppies, they're re-used for art or custom CD cases for indie bands.

     

    Found a box of floppies in various sizes, if I recall that 3M 500K floppy was from a set of disks I used in childhood sometime around the C64/Apple II era and those McAfee VirusScan disks were when my school had a virus outbreak in their Novell WordPerfect PC lab--why I kept that floppy set, they can be erased and reused like I've done with past AOL floppies. In another bin I had even more Double-Density 720K floppies that are packed to be shipped to the UK, a friend still uses my old Amiga 1200.

     

    Old_Stuff.jpg

     

    It was common to use portable HDD cartridges by SyQuest which were really Conner platters in a cartridge with just a single usable magnetic side, the EzFlyer 135 MB was designed to compete with the Iomega Zip and the 230 MB drive made removable storage affordable($30 back in 1996, 135 MB cartridges were reasonable at $15). SyQuest drives were unique as they ran between 3200-4000 RPM depending upon the series/generation(they made 5.25" & 3.5" cartridge drives), plenty fast enough for MIDI synth audio banks/recording your own mix arrangements, in graphic design they were common to transfer files without lugging a heavy external SCSI or Parallel Port HDD around, I actually used cartridges to boot minimal installs of DOS+Windows and MacOS 7.6(PowerMac 7300) if I needed to run a program which wanted more memory.  Reliability of SyQuest pre-SparQ were reasonable, however the SparQ like SyJet was prone to head crashes destroying any inserted storage media which were just as bad as Iomega's Zip click-of-death killing Zip cartridges--SyQuest went bankrupt in 1998, ex-SyQuest engineers later formed Castlewood to release the Orb which suffered a similar reliability nightmare.

    SyQuest.jpg

     

    An old 1GB Western Digital drive, last I recall this drive was pulled from my 486 in 1997 and last spun up in 2002 in a Pentium III... more of a desk paperweight which I originally planned to reuse the platters for a turbine project. Drives after 2003 shifted to glass platters, I think Western Digital was the last to stop using metal platters--encountered a few 80-120GB drives with older platters built in 2004.

    WD94_Front.jpg

     

    When the underside of drives were still exposed and at risk of damage if you weren't careful...

    WD94_Back.jpg

     

    30-Pin RAM: Haven't actively supported any system using this RAM since 2002, these are my leftover test bench sticks. At one point I had over 80 1MB sticks, thankfully vintage computing allowed that stockpile to shrink. Most unlikely clients I've had were Ham Radio operators using old systems for custom controllers handling automated analog/digital recording deck solutions.

     

    30pin_ram.jpg

  5. I'm sick to death of people telling me "if it was so easy, the game devs would have done it by now. They know better than you do."

     

    Here is visible, incontrovertible proof that the games industry can get a huge boost from taking advantage of SIMD today, especially when games require Sandy Bridge or later hardware (meaning AVX is available, but not AVX2 for our purposes).

     

    First Example: Mesh Transform By Translation Using AVX Intrinsics

     

    Example updated and trimmed for readability.

    Spoiler
    
    #include <cstdalign>
    #include <iostream>
    #include <chrono>
    #include <ctime>
    #include <x86intrin.h>
    
    //Size chosen because 30,000 triangles is considered medium-high for modern prominent characters
    const uint size = 90000;
    alignas(32) const float Mat3T[8]    = {1.0f, 2.0f, 3.0f, 1.0f,
                                           2.0f, 3.0f, 1.0f, 2.0f};
    alignas(32)       float Mesh[size]  = {};
    
    void translate_scalar(float *Mesh, const float *translation, const int length)
    {
      for(uint i = 0; i < length; i+=3)
      {
        Mesh[i]   += translation[0];
        Mesh[i+1] += translation[1];
        Mesh[i+2] += translation[2];
      }
    }
    
    void translate_vector(float *Mesh, const float *translation, const uint length)
    {
      __m256 trans = _mm256_load_ps(translation);
      
      //we stay 8 ahead in count so we don't go out of bounds
      uint i = 7;
      for(; i < length; i += 8, Mesh += 8)
      {
        __m256 verts = _mm256_load_ps(Mesh);
        verts        = _mm256_add_ps(verts, trans);
        _mm256_store_ps(Mesh, verts);
        
        trans = _mm256_permute_ps(trans, _MM_SHUFFLE(2, 1, 0, 2));
      }
    
      
    
      //Cleanup loop for cases where length is not a multiple of 8
      uint diff = 8 - (i - length);
      if( diff != 0)
      {
        float temp[8] = {};
        _mm256_store_ps(temp, trans);
        //for(uint j = 0; j < diff; ++j) { Mesh[j] += temp[j]; }
        while(diff != 0)
        {
          *Mesh += temp[7-diff];
          //temp++;
          Mesh++;
          diff--;
        }
      } 
    }
    
    int main()
    {
      using namespace std::chrono;
      std::cout << "Mesh size in floats: " << size << "\n";
      high_resolution_clock::time_point start, end;
      
      start = high_resolution_clock::now();
      translate_scalar(Mesh, Mat3T, size);
      end = high_resolution_clock::now();
    
      duration<double> time_span = duration_cast<duration<double>>(end - start);
      std::cout << "Scalar translation took " << time_span.count() << "s\n";
    
    
      
      start = high_resolution_clock::now();
      translate_vector(Mesh, Mat3T, size);
      end = high_resolution_clock::now();
    
      duration<double> time_span2 = duration_cast<duration<double>>(end - start);
      std::cout << "Vector translation took " << time_span2.count() << "s\n";
    
      /*//This will double-check your work.
      for(uint i = 0; i < size; i += 3)
      {
        std::cout << Mesh[i] << ", " << Mesh[i+1] << ", " << Mesh[i+2] << "\n";
      }
      */
    
    }

     

     

    My average timings and variance for a 4960HQ on my Macbook Pro Retina under Fedora 24, latest kernel as of 10/15/2016:

    Compiler: Clang++ 3.8.0

    Flags:      -std=c++14 -O3 -march=native

    Mesh size in floats: 90000
    Scalar translation took 6.08489e-04s +- 0.11032e-04s
    Vector translation took 5.82480e-05s +- 0.14391e-05s

     

    The short of it is you can write tighter, denser loops with a little bit of effort. While the latency for each vector add is 3 cycles and each multiplication is 5, multiple iterations can be in flight at once on a single thread. The throughput for the vectorized version is 8x the scalar version without any unrolling. Thus, the loop can also easily fit into the small loop detector which can shave off some cycles due to prefetch removal and result forwarding between iterations. Assuming you don't run out of memory bandwidth, you can actually do other tasks on this same core without using hyper threading as long as they do not depend on the result of the mesh manipulation. Looking at the SB block diagram, with each clock achieving both an 8-wide vector multiplication and 8-wide vector addition, you can achieve more than 50GFlops per core on a 2600K, but the memory bandwidth will not allow you to load and store the results as quickly as you can request and produce them at a rate of 50GB/s without high-end dual-channel DDR3 or a quad-channel configuration. It would be best to use a C++ 17 stack-less resumable function to encapsulate this and do short bursts of another task when more than 3 L3 cache misses happen in a row (this can be tracked with a hardware profiler to determine optimal burst lengths).

     

    If there is interest, I can go into nuances of leveraging vectorization techniques in conjunction with other data transforms relevant to gaming (though I'm not giving away my AVX ray tracer). I can also look into benchmarking multicore use of this and balancing it out against other tasks to achieve best performance for a given configuration.

  6. After I used Windows 10 as my primary OS for many months, I realised that I wouldn't miss anything about it if I went back to Windows 7. And since I found that everything was more difficult, more frustrating, more ugly, and more time-consuming on Windows 10, I went back to Windows 7 as my primary OS. Windows 10 made the detail of just having an OS a chore and liability all on its own, whereas Windows 7 is just passively there, like an OS should be, and just works for whatever I decide to do, without any of the barriers, talk-back, and convolution of Windows 10.

     

    This post's sections include:

    1) General Windows 7, Windows 10 user experience comparison

    2) Gaming and application-wise

    3) The modern Microsoft factor

    4) My conclusion

     

     

     

    General Windows 7, Windows 10 user experience comparison:

     

    These are many of the reasons why I found Windows 7 to be a much more sophisticated, smartly-designed, and user-friendly OS than Windows 10:

     

    Windows 7 has a more useful and efficient start-menu design, that takes up less screen space, and requires less mouse travel distance to get to what you want. Pinning applications to a space-efficient list directly above the start button is a lot more space-smart, and functionally-useful than the live-tiles design in Windows 10.

     

    Windows 7 has an intelligent Windows Update set of choices, whereas in Windows 10, unless you edit Group Policies, you have basically no choice. The choice to defer updates is not useful, since deferring them still causes the same ambiguous and random update process to automatically occur, just a couple of months later. There isn't even a choice for how long to defer them. Also, with the Anniversary Update, Microsoft has reduced the availability of Group Policy options in Windows 10, a move which certainly wasn't done to be of any service to Windows 10 Pro license owners.

     

    Customizing file-associations in Windows 7 is straight-forward, while in Windows 10 it can be a repeating arm-wrestle with the OS, as sometimes Win 10 resets the file associations you've changed, and sometimes the ability to change file-associations "bugs," and it doesn't let it be changed, or doesn't list the application you want and doesn't provide any means to add the application you want to use to the list (such as to use Chrome to open URLs from offline, non-browser text).

     

    Windows 10's UI isn't very aesthetic to many people, and Windows 7's UI feels a lot more comfortable to me. Windows 10's UI can be changed to some extent, using programs like Startisback, Classic Shell, or  Start 10, and Aero Glass.

     

    Windows 10's data-collection is invasive, and it isn't straight-forward to turn it off. Microsoft has made effort to spread the settings for various aspects of data-collection in many different places, to make it challenging for a person to find them all and disable them all. And extra efforts may be required to put a more thorough stop to MS' collection of your data, such as those described in the link in my signature. Don't presume that just because you turned off telemetry and data-collection during the Win 10 installation process that you got it all. You'll find more data-collection settings in individual MS apps that need turning off in them after the OS has completed installation.

     

    Windows 10 has so far tended to often require users to redo their OS customization work with new big updates, which can have the magical ability to reset things back to the way MS wants them to be. For that reason, and because of data-collection, and because of file-association challenges, Windows 10 is not a user-friendly OS. It's a for-Microsoft OS, that a user might have to struggle with quite a bit to get the way they want, and to keep it the way they want. It's rather abusive, in this.

     

    In Windows 10, there are in-OS ads, which is something Windows 7 doesn't have. Does anyone want to see advertisement in their personal space? I don't.

     

    In Windows 10, Windows Defender is a nuisance, unless it is permanently disables in Group Policy Editor, and all system warning notifications are disabled (otherwise Windows 10 will constantly bother the user to re-enable Windows Defender).

     

    Windows 10 has (lots of) bugs, and while new versions and patches fix some, they also often create new ones, sometimes major ones. Windows 7 has been generally bug-free (or, few enough that I haven't encountered any since its release).

     

    Microsoft uses Windows 10 to pester users about whatever random thing they want to happen:

    http://www.theverge.com/2016/8/3/12369326/microsoft-windows-10-chrome-battery-life-notifications

    http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/3002960/windows-10-microsoft-is-spamming-chrome-users-with-pop-up-adverts

    https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/732600-windows-10-pushes-notifcaitons-to-remind-you-to-watch-the-superbowl-and-to-purchase-snacks/

    https://www.reddit.com/r/Windows10/comments/5xec80/is_nothing_sacred_advertisement_for_onedrive_in/

    https://www.extremetech.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Assistant-MS.jpg

    https://boards.4chan.org/g/thread/59233293

     

    I feel that the best thing I found about Windows 10 is that, after setting everything up the way that I'd like it, it functions pretty much like Windows 7, with the only differences being worse on Windows 10 than in Windows 7. But since it takes more work to set up than Windows 7, and since it takes work to keep Windows 10 set up the way I want it to be (since Microsoft's Win 10 updates seems to cause people's Windows 10 configurations to reset arbitrarily), I can't see why I would go with the OS that takes ongoing work to be good, rather than the OS that is simply good from the start.

     

    Areas in which I've discovered Windows 7 to be more configurable than Windows 10 include: Windows Updates, system restarting, the Group Policy editor, removing default apps, configuring what the default apps for file-types are, disabling background data-collection, account permissions, and visual customization.

     

     

     

    Gaming and Application-wise:


    There are no tangible performance differences between Windows 7 and Windows 10 in non DirectX 12 games and applications. While I haven't looked at benchmarks on the subject in a long time, last I saw, some games will perform better in one Windows OS compared to another, but, on average, across a large selection of games, Windows 7, 8, and 10 all perform within ~1 FPS of each other, with the two overall fastest Windows OSes being Windows 8, then Windows 7, with Windows 10 coming in last for performance in non DX12 games.

     

    On my dual-boot system, Windows 7 is the OS that's lighter on system resources, using only 13% RAM at idle, compared with 15% RAM-usage at idle in Win 10 (Anniversary Update version).

     

    Compatibility-wise, Windows 7 has better support for a larger amount of games and applications, having been the main gaming OS for a very long time, and continuing to be the OS with the largest market share. Because of this, Windows 7 also has a lot more community guides, fixes, and other materials to get games and applications to run on it, then does any other OS.


    Windows 7 is a more stable and reliable OS in general than Windows 10, and Windows 7 doesn't interfere with online gaming by automatically updating and sharing data, such as can occur in Windows 10, for whatever MS app and service wants to do that. There are more options available to Windows 7 owners, to ensure that there won't be any automatic updates while they're playing their games, and Windows 7 doesn't cloud-share OS updates to other Windows owners, which Windows 10 does, unless a person disables it.
     
    Windows 7 doesn't have directX 12, but it does have Vulkan, which accomplishes the same low-level hardware communication that improves application performance, and Windows 7 in Vulkan is just as good as Windows 10 in DX12. I think that Vulkan is more likely to become the industry standard than DX12, as it is available for all Windows, Linux, and more, OSes, whereas DX12 is only available in Windows 10. As Valve has expressed, there doesn't seem to be much point in making a game DX12, when making it Vulkan will make it accessible cross-platform.

     

    Also, there doesn't currently seem to be any benefit for Nvidia cards in DX12, with Nvidia GPUs typically losing performance when running DX12 modes, compared to their performances while in DX11 mode. Because of this, and because of Vulkan's availability on previous Windows OSes, I think that Windows 10's DX12 has nothing to offer Nvidia GPU owners.
     
    Windows 10 has a lot of problems right now, and Microsoft, with their new QA strategy (having laid off most of their testing engineers), has, so far, been unable to stay on top of them. I would avoid Windows 10 just for that reason. But there are other issues with Windows 10 that make it not the most sound OS for gaming, whatever a person is looking to do with it.

     

     

     

    The modern Microsoft factor:

     

    In the last 3 years, Microsoft has fired around 20,000 employees (many of whom were testing engineers), has changed management, has rearranged internal development and testing structures, has completely shifted business strategies away from software-first to monetization-first, and as a result, is no longer capable of quality product design, or of producing competent software releases. As ridiculous as things seemed to be under Ballmer, Microsoft is a not the same company today, for the worse, and Windows is not the same product anymore, also for the worse. The new Microsoft didn't design and develop the Windows IP, and has simply inherited the Windows IP, and is now just looking for how they can exploit and prostitute every cranny of it. It's just like when a pharmaceutical company buys the rights for a drug that they didn't research or develop, and then jacks the price up by 5000%. Or, it's like when a big publisher buys a developer of a popular game, and turns their game into a dumbed-down, overly-generic version of its previous form.

     

    Currently, Windows 10 is probably the most buggy OS Microsoft has released since Windows ME, and each new major Win 10 update brings as many new bugs as it fixes. I think that Windows 10 simply is not a professional OS. It's like an indie-dev's prototype that never solidifies into anything great, but just morphs from one bloated and troubled presentation to another. Also, Win 10 is littered with "bugs" that are intentional, to keep people using MS services - things like issues with changing default apps away from MS ones. If a program starts doing that on a person's PC, it's called malware. And it's not different when Microsoft does it, through Windows. I think that it is fair to classify Windows 10 as malware, especially since it installed itself on so many PC systems without permission. And malware to be cleaned from a system. 

     

    I think that Windows 10 is not a professional OS, and many businesses agree, and see Windows 10 as a debacle to be avoided, with nothing to be gained over previous versions of Windows, but rather the liabilities of it being a perpetual beta OS, filled with a bunch of consumer crapware and half-baked phone/mobile apps that have no business on a PC. The redesign of Microsoft QA has led to the current situation where accepting Windows updates can actually be more of a liability than not updating Windows:

     

    http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2016/08/kindle-crashes-and-broken-powershell-something-isnt-right-with-windows-10-testing/

    http://www.infoworld.com/article/3107306/microsoft-windows/microsoft-admits-to-distributing-windows-printing-bugs-in-kb-3177725-and-kb-3176493.html

    https://redmondmag.com/articles/2016/06/16/june-patch-breaks-group-policy-settings.aspx

    http://windowsreport.com/partition-disappears-windows-10-anniversary-update/

    http://superuser.com/questions/1022063/windows-10-default-programs-keep-changing

    http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/16-windows-10-anniversary-update-issues-fix/

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonkelly/2016/08/15/microsoft-warns-windows-10-anniversary-update-crashes-problems/

    http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/science-technology/717115/Windows-10-Anniversary-Update-Install-Problems-Fail

    https://www.thurrott.com/windows/windows-10/76719/microsoft-broken-millions-webcams-windows-10-anniversary-update

     

     

    Here's an article looking at what some of the changes have been to Microsoft's style of testing. With Microsoft having halved the number of OS testing engineers, there are bound to be differences between traditional Windows QA and modern Windows QA results: Why did Microsoft lay off 'Programmatic testers'?

     

    Windows today is not the Windows we are familiar with, and Microsoft today is not the Microsoft we are familiar with. I think that both of those things, in their modern forms, are shit.

     

    And, in both my opinion, and experience with using Windows 10 since its release, using Windows 10 is sort of like walking through a minefield, in that you never know when something is going to screw something up, or even everything up, but you know that there are issues lying in wait to go off, all over the place. And every so often, sometimes frequently, something happens to create frustration, and requires work, sometimes a lot of work, to get sorted out.

     

     

     

    My conclusion:

     

    Windows 10 is a hyper-invasive, user-fighting, buggy, perpetual beta/demo version of Windows, that is ad-supported, and which is a constant chore and headache to keep set up, and to get it to do what a user wants it to.

    On the other hand, Windows 7, at least up until June / July 2015, behaves like it is the full version of Windows, which just works, obeys the user, and doesn't collect a user's data for resale to make MS money, and doesn't try to trick the user at every turn, or even at all.

     

    In my view, Windows 10 is a snake-oil OS, and many people are merely caught up in a sentiment they have of Windows 10 being new and the future, and they just want to ride that fluffy feeling while shutting down their minds completely.

    Meanwhile, the I find reality to be that Windows 10 has less useful functionality than Windows 7, is a lot less stable and reliable than Windows 7, is less user-friendly than Windows 7, offers a PC admin less control than Windows 7, is more invasive than Windows 7, has in-OS ads which Windows 7 doesn't, has an excess of bloatware pre-installed while Windows 7 doesn't, and constantly resets customised file-associations to force people into using MS applications, which Windows 7 doesn't do.

  7. Picture with actual parts instead of a drawing...

    WP_20160814_13_16_48_Pro.jpg

  8. nvidia-logo.pngintel-inside-2013.pngamd-logo.png

     

    …is a pretty unique one. Let me explain.

     

    When I was a child, I would entertain myself with all sorts of PC games. My favourites were old ones – usually, they were W2K-compatible – including RollerCoaster Tycoon 2, Age of Empires I and II, Pharaoh/Cleopatra, Caesar III, and a few other ones I can’t remember. As I grew older, I started programming, and gradually outgrew video games; the more I learned about computers, the less interest I had in games.

     

    rct2.png

     

    Throughout all of this time, there was no such thing as a “gaming PC” to me. Never heard that in my life back then. I had a relative who built PCs, and I thought that was real cool when I was young, but I was still afraid of it all and unsure so I stayed away. By the time I became educated enough to build a PC, Haswell was the here-and-now, and my interest in gaming was almost out the window… almost. I knew what a GPU was and all, but I never had a need for one!

     

    pwenet-pcpp.png

     

    As the years waned on, I learned more and more about the Internet, and learned how to protect my identity and privacy OTI. I started using GNU/Linux more and more frequently, still only playing games on Windows on occasion. Finally, in 2014 I quit using Windows altogether, and with it my gaming habits took another deathly blow. As the dust settled, and as Broadwell hit the market (better late than never), ideas about what I really wanted out of my system began to form.

     

    intel.png

     

    Broadwell put a whole new light in my eyes, for what a good system running Linux could be. Because of the current state of affairs with dedicated GPU (dGPU) drivers being a deplorable mess on our operating system (see this image for details), and the fact that the only good drivers on Linux were Intel’s, I knew I had no choice but to choose Intel for my GPU needs. It was like a match made in heaven: with how little I played video games being sated by an Iris Pro iGPU, on top of having 128MiB of L4 cache plus an unlocked design and four hyperthreaded cores with VT-x and VT-d… it was all I could ask for.

     

    cpu.png

     

    …but sadly, Broadwell and I were not meant to be. The LGA 1150 platform was on its way out, along with DDR3 and the rest of the Haswell-era junk. I wanted something new, running fast DDR4 DIMMs with large capacities and good speeds, and I wanted a Skylake chip for sure. Skylake… it was such a pristine name to grace my ears. I had to have it. And so, piecing a build together over the course of a few months, I finally built Henen-nesw, a working tractor beam Skylake PC running a Core i3 with Intel HD graphics. Later on I was enticed by rumours of the next step in Intel’s lineup—Kaby Lake—having SKUs built like Broadwell but with all of the modern amenities that Skylake had. And at that point… I was set for Kaby Lake-S Iris Pro.

     

    skylake-die.jpg

     

    …Now, all this time I haven’t said one word about that NIC. Why? Well, I thought I’d save it for my loyal readers, who push through to the end! Mwahahaha! Thank you!

     

    So I’ve gone over how in love I am with Intel’s soon-to-be-released Kaby Lake Iris Pro graphics. We all know at this point that I simply have no use for Nvidia’s or AMD’s dGPUs at all on the mainstream. But I’ll tell you, while I won’t spend $250 on a dGPU, I will spend $250 on a network card.

     

    But why?

     

    Interestingly enough, Google Fiber (yes, fibre optics) is under construction right now in our metro! And I would love more than anything to get the best internet speeds and even greater speeds on my intranet, enjoying over 1 gigabyte per second locally, and 1 gigabit per second through the tubes. Google Fiber has even put our suburb specifically on the map, too! And considering our unique location for running cables, Google may cut us some slack and let us sign up just for that.


    One can only hope, right?

     

    …right?

     

    ;)

  9. Train Your Mind To feel confident about the ability you have

     One of the worst things we do to feel bad about our self is that we demotivate ourselves by saying that we cannot perform a particular time, and we are unable to do it because of a number of disadvantages in ourselves.

     This means that we have lost the fight even before we make an attempt to win it.

     If you do so, you will not only lose the fight but also lose self-confidence. The latter will shatter you, and you will have no opportunity to get up and fight again. Losing self-confidence is one of the biggest mistakes we make, and if we continue to do so, we will be no better than a dead person. Understand this point and make sure that you start looking for ways in which you replace your negative thoughts with positive ones.

     One of the biggest advantages you get while staying positive is that you creatively start looking for ways in which you can achieve a particular goal and be happy about the achievement you have achieved on your own.

     So stop forcing yourself to think that you cannot do it and start looking for ways in which you can do it.

     Please note that we are talking about the positive things that should be taken up by an individual on a regular basis. Any act that makes you negative or is illegal should not be encouraged.

     

    Stay healthy

     It is important to stay healthy because a healthy body will help you synced with a healthy and Happy mind. There are so many ways in which you can stay healthy, and one of the ways in which you can do so is by choosing healthy snacks to fill your tummy. This is important for all of us because a healthy body helps us stay positive and feel good about the decisions we are about to make. Moreover, it helps us think about savings. Yes, we save money by staying healthy. We save money by not making a visit to the doctors clinic to pay him fees for your treatment. You do not waste your money on medicines and Important operations that might be necessary if you are not healthy.

     This is one of the reasons because of which we urge you to stay healthy throughout your life.

     

    Don't wait until the last minute

     This is an issue for most of us because we make the mistake of keeping a number of things for the last minute. This is not a good thing to do because if you do so, you will have to face a number of issues and you will not be happy with the ways in which things procedure. This is because it is possible that you might feel the need to carry out an additional task which was not planned earlier. In this case, everything will be in a mess, and you will not be happy with the result.

     So make it a point to be sure that you do not leave anything for the last minute.

     

    Free up your mind

     it is important to get rid of unnecessary thoughts that are occupying space in your mind and preventing you from working on things you should be working on. Focus is important, and we all know it. If you have unnecessary thoughts occupying your mind, you will not be in a position to focus on productive tasks that can help you get rid of problems that are being faced by you in life.

     

    Take up a course that creates interest in your mind

     This can be a difficult option for those who have never found interest in completing the course they have opted for. Please note that opting for such courses should be directly linked to your business growth.

    The best part is that there are so many business related courses available for learners that you'll definitely end up choosing at least one course.

    The important points relating to the chosen course are noted below.

    1.    It should help your business grow. If you are working for someone, the course should either help you shift to the desired business cycle or improve your chances of promotion.

    2.    The course should not take up too much time of your schedule. If the course requires you to spend too many hours on a daily or weekly basis, your routine will be disturbed. We are sure that you do not want that to happen. So, be careful about this point.

    3.    Don’t opt for more than one course at a time. If you choose more than one course at a time, you'll end up messing yourself, and you might not finish even one of the many courses you have opted for. So, do not make this mistake.

     

    Take some time out for yourself

    You are working hard, and you should be rewarded for your efforts. One of the ways in which you case reward yourself is by taking some time out for yourself.

    You can achieve this by moving out of your stressed zone and traveling to a place that keeps you peaceful or simply rest for some time.

    Traveling to a place that keeps you peaceful is a great idea because you'll be able to calm down your worries and get back on track with a fresh mind.

    Have a plan to travel on a budget? Make sure that you get an amazing discount on the same by simply completing your bookings from hotel booking sites like Travel Ticker. So, start looking for it and get amazing deals on the same.

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    @Hackentosher Gave me another idea for a project. Designing a case. This would be awesome for learning CAD and to use sketchup. I also forgot to add Eclipse Engine to my project list!

     

    Project 5: Custom case

    Project 6: Eclipse Engine I 

  10. Deals

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    Dell OptiPlex 3020 Small Form Factor with Windows 7 Pro, Intel Core i5 processor, 4GB memory and 500GB hard drive for only $499. Plus, free shipping

    source

  11. So I totally forgot about this blog! here is a link to my google drive with pics of my current setup https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B_HGP6-H6_CMWDlQVG5rVGhCQ2c

  12. Resources:

     

    PC and VM- Yes

    Windows 95 ISO- Will be using Win95 Beta

     

    Installing right now.

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    Cpus are a hard choice.

    Doesnt servers work good with multiple cores? probably yes,

    so i want to see what will work,

    Pentuim G440 or Used  E5-2670 (no v2 or 3)

    Both similarly priced.

    Also memory and a motherboard with do. just need to look for one.

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    Most people describe Beats as either overpriced or that they sound awful. Two things statements in that sentence, "overpriced, and "sound awful", need to be addressed. Consumers say that Beats is overpriced, but compared to what? You can't say something is overpriced unless you can compare it to something that has a better value than what you are calling overpriced. Secondly, people say that Beats sound terrible simple because the music they listen to doesn't fit the sound signature that Beats implements in their headphones. I'm not trying to defend Beats nor am I trying to rant about them what I'm trying to say is that sound is subjective and what may sound good to one person, may sound like total shit to another person. I don't personally like Beats by Dre because the music I listen to doesn't go well with the Beats sound signature and that the bass is overpowering but I have a friend who listens to a lot of bass heavy music who owns a pair of Razer Kraken headphones who would love the way Beats sound. I tell him that he would love a pair but he says he doesn't want to spend an additional 150 plus dollars on another pair of headphones which brings me to my next point. Yes Beats are not cheap but there is a big reason why. If you go around asking people about headphone brands they've heard about most people would most likely bring up Beats. There's two causes for this. One, Dr. Dre. put his name one them. Dr. Dre, as we all know is a very famous artist. Since, Dr. Dre endorsed this headphone brand, people figured oh, if he makes these headphones then they have to be good. The second cause is this, Beats spends a ton of money of packaging, and advertisement. Beats, I'd be willing to bet, costs less than 200 dollars is parts to make but many of them cost over twice as much. If you go around asking people if they have heard of brands like Audio Technica or Sennheiser most consumers would probably say no. That's because Beats spend a ton of money on marketing to get their name out there. Beats also spend a ton of money on packaging. I got a pair of Beats and returned them after a week. The unboxing experience was probably the best unboxing I had for a pair of headphones. As a result Beats owns over 64% of the headphone market. That is HUGE. Beats are also extremely well built and look "great" (looks are subjective). It seems that Beats does everything so well except the sound according to most people. In the end when you are in the market for a pair of headphones choose your price range, and what you care more about, sound or build quality and looks. That's all I have to say. In Linus Tech Tip outro fashion, like this blog if you liked, dislike it if you disliked it (wait you can't dislike posts here), leave a comment if your feelings are mixed and don't forget to subscribe (but why would you :)).   

  13. So I got a PowerBook G4. Yay! Only problem is, Mac OS X 10.5.8 is just borderline useful in 2016, especially on a PowerPC machine with 512MB RAM. That, and I grew frustrated with the way how Mac OS X is designed. So, I decided to install Linux on it. Here's how things went down:
     

    • Downloaded Ubuntu MATE 15.10 PowerPC ISO
    • Wrote it to an 8GB flash drive using LiLi
    • Tried booting to it, it wouldn't boot
    • Tried using the Mini ISO instead
    • Mini ISO was missing a lot of things
    • When I finally got it working, it was missing a lot of kernel modules (among other things) and was incredibly slow, almost slower than Mac OS X was; it was also extremely prone to breaking
    • Finally figure out what I was doing wrong, used dd to write the ISO to the flash drive instead of LiLi and it booted
    • Installed Ubuntu graphically, after working around a bug I encountered early on in my adventure that causes Ubuntu to crash if I don't type "radeon.agpmode=-1" into the yaboot prompt when booting or yaboot.conf file
    • Using nano in a tty, I added "radeon.agpmode=-1" to yaboot.conf, updated the boot partition and rebooted to keep it from crashing
    • Couldn't get wireless working, still used Ethernet for internetting
    • Got sound working by editing the config files and alsamixer in a terminal
    • Still couldn't get wireless working, put in an 802.11g PC Card into the PCMCIA slot instead

     

    And now I have a more useful PowerBook G4. Runs much better than OS X did, too, and it'll run even better when I upgrade it to 2GB RAM. Maybe an SSD too... but getting to this point took so friggin' long and I'm glad it's over.

     

    JXA7T9e.png

  14. I'm a bit late but I have been studying a lot in my spare time in order to meet my schedule, so please forgive me for my lateness. Anyways.........!

     

    Now the book I am using to study this with has a "skip" section on the handwriting section if your aim is to just read/speak it, but if you wish to persist through this too, I've taken some sample shots of the pages' instructions. If you need clearer images, I went ahead and googled some more references for you that you can get to by clicking the title of the Spoiler Tag. All of the Handwriting section will be under a spoiler, since by itself it is huge and because it is skippable.
     

    ~Russian Handwriting~

    Spoiler

    umYjgxa.png

    r6nVsAz.png

    SHNHxb1.png

    lmH4Jt5.png

    1fs1vug.png

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Yup. That's the end of that. Feel free to practice it!

     

     

    More on Russian Pronunciation: Stress

     

    Just like in English (or many other languages) some syllables in Russian are pronounced more prominently than others. In English, for example, consider the differences of "Phótograph" and "Photógraphy". If you don't know the differences of the words, pronounce each carefully. Notice how in "Phótograph" you put more emphasis on the first syllable? And in the second word "Photógraphy" the stress is marked on the second syllable. Stress in Linguistics is signaled by an increased loudness, vowel length, full articulation of a vowel, and changes in pitch. If you need more information on syllables and stress, please consider looking into the links I have provided at the bottom of this entry under "Resources".

     

    Continuing on: In Russian, normal writing does not mark stress visually, just like in English, so it is important to learn the stress of words or the general stress rule. Be careful though with stress in words and most definitely names, since the traditional English pronunciation is often never matches the Russian. For example, English speakers tend to put stress on "влади́мир" (Vladimir) in the first syllable like so "Vládimir", but in Russian stress is always placed on the second syllable, like so "[Vla-de’е-meer]".

     

    Here are some more examples:

     

    • The writer Pasternak is "Пастерна́к" (not Pа́sternak)
    • Nabokov is "Набо́ков " (not Nа́bokov)
    • Oblomov (a man in Goncharо́v's famous novel) is "Обло́мов" (not О́blomov)

     

    Stress in Russian is heavier than it is in English and much harder to predict which syllable is going to get lucky and get marked for stress. Sometimes you will find that different forms of the same word will have different stresses. For example, in Russian hand "Рука́" and  hands "Ру́ки" have two completely different stresses. The first "Рука́" has stress on the end and the second word "Ру́ки" has stress on the first. It is one of the many reasons why you should learn the stress of words you are learning/know of...otherwise, if you do not know the stress, the safest method to proceed is to read it without stress at all, syllable by syllable.

     

    Next we delve into a bit more of the Linguistics of the language itself. If your goal is to just be understood, feel free to skip this. But if you are like me, you want to know how things work and why. If you are, the following six points will show you the small differences between Moscow Russian is written and the way it is pronounced.

     

    Softness;

     

    Many call it the indication of a good Russian accent and from what I have heard and dealt with, I'd agree with them. I learned more about what this is actually called (and generally more about it) from a friend (@aalsuvorov) who has been willing to educate me further in Russian. What it is is the correct pronunciation of soft consonants and you might be wondering what "soft consonants" are. Well,  "soft" means the consonant is pronounced with a simultaneous y sound. You can tell if a consonant is soft if it is followed by any of these letters/sounds:

    е ё и ю я or the soft sign "Ь".

     

    The main thing you must remember to do is pronounce the y sound with the consonant before it. Many people end up pronouncing the two separately instead of simultaneously. For example the word "сове́т" ('council') is pronounced [s-a-vy-е́-t] — that's five sounds. The vy (soft в) is not two sounds, but one! In English, we say it "s-o-v-i-e-t", six, instead of five sounds!

     

    Hard Consonants vs Soft Consonants;

     

    'Hard' consonants are pronounced just like in English, without the simultaneous y sound like in soft consonants. Earlier, in "", we learned there are twenty consonants. Of them, with the exception of "" and "", are all hard consonants. "" and "" are always soft! Of the other eighteen, fifteen of them will tell you if they are to be pronounced soft, as they will always be marked with any of "е ё и ю я" or the soft sign shown above. For example, "Л" [l] is hard but "Ль" [ly] is soft! That is to say, in Russian "[l]" and "[ly]" are two different sounds, but to many English speakers they probably just think it is a variant (allophone) of [l].

     

    For example, compare the [l] in "people" to the [l] in "leaf". Do you hear the difference (different dialects might make this hard though)? The [l] in "people"  is like "Л" (hard) while the [l] in "leaf" is like "Ль" (soft). Do you notice the differences? Here are some more examples of hard and soft consonants in Russian:

     

    • Мйло [meela] 'nice' - hard л
    • Мйля [meelya] 'mile' - soft ль
    • Лук [look] 'onion' - hard l
    • Люк [lyook] 'hatch' - [ly] is soft
    • Мат [mat] 'bad language', 'abuse'  - hard т
    • Мать [maty] 'mother' - soft ть
    • Мать [maty] 'mother' - hard М
    • Мять [myaty] 'to crumple' - soft [my]

     

    Before И the [y] element is less audible but please be aware that regardless the consonant is still soft.

     

    • Бить [beety] 'to beat' - soft Б

     

    However, if the 'Б' was hard, the vowel would not be и but ы. For example:

     

    • Быть [bity] 'to be' - hard Б

     

    Consonants that are always hard: Ж Ц Ш

     

    Even though the letters е ё и ю я ь mark the preceding consonant soft, there are exceptions...like most languages. Thankfully not as much as French, though. They are the following: Ж Ц Ш. These letters are always—always—pronounced hard (no [y] sound!), no matter the following letter. Like the word Жена́ 'wife' is pronounced [zhe-nа́] —the [y] of the letter e [ye] simply disappears.And in Жёны 'wives' is pronounced as if it were written like Жо́ны [zhо́-ni]. Ты зна́ешь 'you know' is actually pronounced as if it were written like Ты зна́еш [znа́-yesh]. The soft sign has no effect and has become historical in usage only.

     

    Oh, and before I forget to add it...after the letters 'Ж', 'Ц' and 'Ш' you should hear the vowel и [ee] pronounced as if it were actually ы [ i ]. As so:

     

    • Жить [zhity] 'to live'
    • Цирк [tsirk] 'circus'

     

     

    Next time on Learning Russian! (lol) we learn about voiced and unvoiced consonants! How fun! Stick around and just remember...practice makes perfect! Or so they say... :ph34r:

     

     

  15. So, I have not been exactly the most active blog member. I've been going through a job change- from IT Technician to Network Manager at the biggest school in my town. So proud. Anyway, places change, jobs change but people... people never change. A girl came up today asking for a "Geiger counter". If I was a halfwit I'd have no idea what she was on about but I know a few things about science, 3 to be exact. I said I'm the Network manager but she said "my teacher told me to go to the technician". "Well, maybe your teacher had the science technician in mind"? Damn.

     

    Over and out. I'll have probably less blog entries now since this sort of thing is rare unlike my previous job...

  16. Undeadgaming56
    Latest Entry

    My computer is

    CPU: AMD FX-4300 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler 
    Motherboard: ASRock 970 EXTREME4 ATX AM3+ Motherboard
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory
    Storage: Kingston Savage 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive
    Storage: Western Digital BLACK SERIES 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB TWIN FROZR Video Card 
    Case: Corsair SPEC-03 Red ATX Mid Tower Case 
    Power Supply: Silverstone Strider Gold 450W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular SFX Power Supply   
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM (64-bit)

     

    I need to know what drivers to install 

  17. Lerodz8

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    Can my system upgrade to a gtx 950 it has a : >AMD FX-4300 3.8GHz

    >8GB DDR3 1600

    >AMD Radeon HD 7670 2GB GDDR3

    >a 350w power supply

    >Chipset AMD 970

    >http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA24G1XA5604&cm_re=cm1855-_-9SIA24G1XA5604-_-Product (link to my pc incase of any question's)

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    GPU:ASUS STRIX Geforce GTX 950 2GB                     

    CPU:Intel core i5 4460 3.2Ghz                                      

    PSU:EVGA  500 W1 80+                                                                         

    Motherboard:ASRockH97ATXLGA1150                    

    Case:Raidmax Vortex V4 ATX Mid Tower Case         

    RAM:CorsairVengeance8GBDDR31600                    

    Storage:WD Blue 1TB                                                    

    Monitor: Asus VH238H