Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

How do you work out how many calculation per second a GPU can do?


Best Answer MG2R , 21 August 2013 - 03:18 PM

The thing I'm finding difficult to come to terms with is float point opeartion?

A FLOP is one single operation on a floating point number. Floating point numbers are a way of representing decimal numbers in binary.

Go to the full post


  • Please log in to reply
31 replies to this topic

#1 LibeRatioNZzXx

LibeRatioNZzXx

    Junior Member

  • Member
  • 121 posts
  • LocationCambridgeshire, England

Posted 21 August 2013 - 02:39 PM

I'm just curious to whether there is an easy way to calculate how many calculations per second a GPU can do, if it's possible even better would be how to calculate how many of those calculations per second can be utilized.

 


| Cooler Master HAF 912 Plus | MSI P67A-G45 | i5 2500K @ 4.2GHz |  Coolermaster Hyper 212 Plus | EVGA GTX 670 FTW Edition 2GB | 8GB (2X4GB) Mushkin Blackline @ 1600MHz | 256GB OCZ Vertex 4 SSD | 1TB Western Digital Caviar Green | Corsair 600CX V2 | Windows 7 64-bit |


Login or Create an Account to get rid of this ad! Login or Create an Account to get rid of this ad!

#2 T.Vengeance

T.Vengeance

    The Oncoming Storm

  • Member
  • 2,318 posts
  • LocationToronto, Canada

Posted 21 August 2013 - 02:43 PM

Just a guess but I'd say it's the same with CPUs in terms of how many FLOPs it can perform.

 

In the case of a GTX680 (http://en.wikipedia....286xx.29_series) it can perform 3090.4 GFLOPS


When kids look up to great scientists the way they do to great musicians and actors, civilization will jump to the next level

                                                                                                                                                                                         -Brian Greene

The Most Astounding Fact


#3 Maskot

Maskot

    Toast

  • Member
  • 1,500 posts
  • LocationWellington, Florida, US

Posted 21 August 2013 - 02:44 PM

1MHz = 1,000,000 calculations, so 1260MHz = 1,260,000,000 calculations


Available from 3pm to Midnight Eastern Time (GMT-5). (>'-')> <('-'<) ^(' - ')^ <('-'<) (>'-')> You can't stop the kirby dance. 

Current Build


#4 T.Vengeance

T.Vengeance

    The Oncoming Storm

  • Member
  • 2,318 posts
  • LocationToronto, Canada

Posted 21 August 2013 - 02:47 PM

1MHz = 1,000,000 calculations, so 1260MHz = 1,260,000,000 calculations

Depends actually: http://en.wikipedia....FLOPS#Computing


When kids look up to great scientists the way they do to great musicians and actors, civilization will jump to the next level

                                                                                                                                                                                         -Brian Greene

The Most Astounding Fact


#5 LibeRatioNZzXx

LibeRatioNZzXx

    Junior Member

  • Member
  • 121 posts
  • LocationCambridgeshire, England

Posted 21 August 2013 - 02:48 PM

1MHz = 1,000,000 calculations, so 1260MHz = 1,260,000,000 calculations

Problem with that is their's a core clock and memory clock, and from what I've read the average can do 4 billion calculations a second or 4GHz, but no GPU's core clock is clocked to that high a frequency


| Cooler Master HAF 912 Plus | MSI P67A-G45 | i5 2500K @ 4.2GHz |  Coolermaster Hyper 212 Plus | EVGA GTX 670 FTW Edition 2GB | 8GB (2X4GB) Mushkin Blackline @ 1600MHz | 256GB OCZ Vertex 4 SSD | 1TB Western Digital Caviar Green | Corsair 600CX V2 | Windows 7 64-bit |


#6 LibeRatioNZzXx

LibeRatioNZzXx

    Junior Member

  • Member
  • 121 posts
  • LocationCambridgeshire, England

Posted 21 August 2013 - 02:52 PM

Just a guess but I'd say it's the same with CPUs in terms of how many FLOPs it can perform.

 

In the case of a GTX680 (http://en.wikipedia....286xx.29_series) it can perform 3090.4 GFLOPS

My question would be is it measurable in anything simpler than flops? I was planning to use it in an algorithm for a program, and order to do that I need to be able to work out how long it will take to do all the calculations to find x.


| Cooler Master HAF 912 Plus | MSI P67A-G45 | i5 2500K @ 4.2GHz |  Coolermaster Hyper 212 Plus | EVGA GTX 670 FTW Edition 2GB | 8GB (2X4GB) Mushkin Blackline @ 1600MHz | 256GB OCZ Vertex 4 SSD | 1TB Western Digital Caviar Green | Corsair 600CX V2 | Windows 7 64-bit |


#7 Maskot

Maskot

    Toast

  • Member
  • 1,500 posts
  • LocationWellington, Florida, US

Posted 21 August 2013 - 02:55 PM

 

 

Problem with that is their's a core clock and memory clock, and from what I've read the average can do 4 billion calculations a second or 4GHz, but no GPU's core clock is clocked to that high a frequency

It was just a general assumption.


Available from 3pm to Midnight Eastern Time (GMT-5). (>'-')> <('-'<) ^(' - ')^ <('-'<) (>'-')> You can't stop the kirby dance. 

Current Build


#8 Glenwing

Glenwing

    Chivalrous Gentleman

  • Moderator
  • 4,535 posts

User's Awards

           

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:04 PM

1MHz = 1,000,000 calculations, so 1260MHz = 1,260,000,000 calculations

 

Hz is not a unit for calculations, it a generic unit for frequency.  It describes the operating frequency of the GPU cores, but there are thousands of cores, and they do a very large number of calculations on each cycle.


Forum Code of Conduct
 
Current Machines

#9 Glenwing

Glenwing

    Chivalrous Gentleman

  • Moderator
  • 4,535 posts

User's Awards

           

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:05 PM

My question would be is it measurable in anything simpler than flops? I was planning to use it in an algorithm for a program, and order to do that I need to be able to work out how long it will take to do all the calculations to find x.

 

Not really xD That is the number of floating point operations it performs per second...


Forum Code of Conduct
 
Current Machines

#10 MG2R

MG2R

    THE (senior) noob

  • Moderator
  • 2,068 posts

User's Awards

     

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:15 PM

My question would be is it measurable in anything simpler than flops? I was planning to use it in an algorithm for a program, and order to do that I need to be able to work out how long it will take to do all the calculations to find x.

Well, if the instructions in that calculation all take as long as a FLOP, then you can calculate the time with the FLOPs from the specs.

On the other hand, you could just write the code for the calculation and do something like this:

//pseudocode

double start= getMilliSeconds();     //current time in milliseconds.
doCalculation();                          //solve for x
double stop=getMilliSeconds();

double timeToPerformCalculation=stop-start        //in milliseconds

to find the time. If you are using Matlab, you can use 'tic' before doCalculation() and 'toc' after, this will print out the time needed to the console.

 

Keep in mind that this time is not set in stone, unless you have hardware level access to the cores (which you absolutely don't). The time it takes to perform your calculation is based on the scheduling algorithm used by the OS your application is running on.


GAMING RIG -- K'NEX SERVER -- LINUX TUTORIAL -- NOCTUA PSU

Code of Conduct -- Legal Issues -- Moderators

This mod is on vacation due to busy personal life ATM. He still tries to read PMs. More on it here.


#11 LibeRatioNZzXx

LibeRatioNZzXx

    Junior Member

  • Member
  • 121 posts
  • LocationCambridgeshire, England

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:15 PM

Not really xD That is the number of floating point operations it performs per second...

The thing I'm finding difficult to come to terms with is float point opeartion?


| Cooler Master HAF 912 Plus | MSI P67A-G45 | i5 2500K @ 4.2GHz |  Coolermaster Hyper 212 Plus | EVGA GTX 670 FTW Edition 2GB | 8GB (2X4GB) Mushkin Blackline @ 1600MHz | 256GB OCZ Vertex 4 SSD | 1TB Western Digital Caviar Green | Corsair 600CX V2 | Windows 7 64-bit |


#12 MG2R

MG2R

    THE (senior) noob

  • Moderator
  • 2,068 posts

User's Awards

     

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:18 PM   Best Answer

The thing I'm finding difficult to come to terms with is float point opeartion?

A FLOP is one single operation on a floating point number. Floating point numbers are a way of representing decimal numbers in binary.


GAMING RIG -- K'NEX SERVER -- LINUX TUTORIAL -- NOCTUA PSU

Code of Conduct -- Legal Issues -- Moderators

This mod is on vacation due to busy personal life ATM. He still tries to read PMs. More on it here.


#13 LibeRatioNZzXx

LibeRatioNZzXx

    Junior Member

  • Member
  • 121 posts
  • LocationCambridgeshire, England

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:18 PM

Well, if the instructions in that calculation all take as long as a FLOP, then you can calculate the time with the FLOPs from the specs.

On the other hand, you could just write the code for the calculation and do something like this:

//pseudocode

double start= getMilliSeconds();     //current time in milliseconds.
doCalculation();                          //solve for x
double stop=getMilliSeconds();

double timeToPerformCalculation=stop-start        //in milliseconds

to find the time. If you are using Matlab, you can use 'tic' before doCalculation() and 'toc' after, this will print out the time needed to the console.

 

Keep in mind that this time is not set in stone, unless you have hardware level access to the cores (which you absolutely don't). The time it takes to perform your calculation is based on the scheduling algorithm used by the OS your application is running on.

Problem is I don't plan to do the calculations to be specific I want to try and create a hybrid of a system such as howsecureismypassword.net I don't plan to do the calculation myself to work out how long it will takes as that can be pretty long...


| Cooler Master HAF 912 Plus | MSI P67A-G45 | i5 2500K @ 4.2GHz |  Coolermaster Hyper 212 Plus | EVGA GTX 670 FTW Edition 2GB | 8GB (2X4GB) Mushkin Blackline @ 1600MHz | 256GB OCZ Vertex 4 SSD | 1TB Western Digital Caviar Green | Corsair 600CX V2 | Windows 7 64-bit |


#14 LibeRatioNZzXx

LibeRatioNZzXx

    Junior Member

  • Member
  • 121 posts
  • LocationCambridgeshire, England

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:20 PM

A FLOP is one single operation on a floating point number. Floating point numbers are a way of representing decimal numbers in binary.

Ahh I can understand that! Thanks for the help!


| Cooler Master HAF 912 Plus | MSI P67A-G45 | i5 2500K @ 4.2GHz |  Coolermaster Hyper 212 Plus | EVGA GTX 670 FTW Edition 2GB | 8GB (2X4GB) Mushkin Blackline @ 1600MHz | 256GB OCZ Vertex 4 SSD | 1TB Western Digital Caviar Green | Corsair 600CX V2 | Windows 7 64-bit |


#15 MG2R

MG2R

    THE (senior) noob

  • Moderator
  • 2,068 posts

User's Awards

     

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:21 PM

Problem is I don't plan to do the calculations to be specific I want to try and create a hybrid of a system such as howsecureismypassword.net I don't plan to do the calculation myself to work out how long it will takes as that can be pretty long...

Why is it so important that you know how long the calculation takes to execute?


GAMING RIG -- K'NEX SERVER -- LINUX TUTORIAL -- NOCTUA PSU

Code of Conduct -- Legal Issues -- Moderators

This mod is on vacation due to busy personal life ATM. He still tries to read PMs. More on it here.


#16 hamzatu2

hamzatu2

    Tesla

  • Member
  • 832 posts
  • LocationYouTube

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:22 PM

Problem with that is their's a core clock and memory clock, and from what I've read the average can do 4 billion calculations a second or 4GHz, but no GPU's core clock is clocked to that high a frequency


I think you mean 4 million transistors?

I am pretty sure this is WRONG but Try this multiply cores by speed. (speed as in 1 mhz 1,000,000 calculations times cores)

Yeah....... This is soo wrong :P

Awesome profile picture huh? Please double check anything I say to make sure it is correct, because I am not always correct.

Intel i5 4670k @4.1ghz - EVGA GTX 760  - Corsair 8 GB Vengeance @1866 - Gigabyte Z87 UD3H - Corsair H100i - Samsung 120 GB EVO + Seagate 2 TB 7200rpm - Corsair TX850M - Fractal Arc Midi R2 - Logitech K120 Keyboard ($10) - ASUS VS239H-P 23-Inch Full HD LED IPS Monitor + BenQ T91W TN 900p 19" - HP PhotoSmart C4680 - Genius SP-S110 $12) - Rosewill N900PCE - Blue Snowball - Perixx MX-2000II- Audio Technica ATH-M30

 

#17 hamzatu2

hamzatu2

    Tesla

  • Member
  • 832 posts
  • LocationYouTube

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:28 PM

How about working it backwards in order for the gou to kick out 60hz or fps at 1080p it must do the following
1920 x 1080= 2073600
Now multiply that by 3 since that is the number of sub pixels per pixel
=6220800

now multiply by 60 for 60fps
=373248000

So that is the number of bits the gpu must kick out if it is running 60 fps 1080p

Again this is probably wrong :P

Awesome profile picture huh? Please double check anything I say to make sure it is correct, because I am not always correct.

Intel i5 4670k @4.1ghz - EVGA GTX 760  - Corsair 8 GB Vengeance @1866 - Gigabyte Z87 UD3H - Corsair H100i - Samsung 120 GB EVO + Seagate 2 TB 7200rpm - Corsair TX850M - Fractal Arc Midi R2 - Logitech K120 Keyboard ($10) - ASUS VS239H-P 23-Inch Full HD LED IPS Monitor + BenQ T91W TN 900p 19" - HP PhotoSmart C4680 - Genius SP-S110 $12) - Rosewill N900PCE - Blue Snowball - Perixx MX-2000II- Audio Technica ATH-M30

 

#18 Dravic

Dravic

    VIA CPUs Fanboy

  • Banned
  • 1,717 posts

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:28 PM

I think you mean 4 million transistors?

I am pretty sure this is WRONG but Try this multiply cores by speed. (speed as in 1 mhz 1,000,000 calculations times cores)

Yeah....... This is soo wrong :P

 

there's something like Instructions per cycle otherwise an i3 wouldn't destroy FX-9590 in gaming.


So... If Jesus had the gold, would he buy himself out instead of waiting 3 days for the respawn?

CPU: Phenom II x6 1045t ][ GPU: GeForce 9600GT 512mb DDR3 ][ Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-MA770T-UD3P ][ RAM: 2x4GB Kingston 1333MHz CL9 DDR3 ][ HDD: Western Digital Green 2TB ][ PSU: Chieftec 500AB A ][ Case: No-name without airflow or dust filters Budget saved for an upgrade so far: 2400PLN (600€) - Initial 2800PLN (700€) Upgraded already: CPU


#19 hamzatu2

hamzatu2

    Tesla

  • Member
  • 832 posts
  • LocationYouTube

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:29 PM

there's something like Instructions per cycle otherwise an i3 wouldn't destroy FX-9590 in gaming.


Something like that?

Awesome profile picture huh? Please double check anything I say to make sure it is correct, because I am not always correct.

Intel i5 4670k @4.1ghz - EVGA GTX 760  - Corsair 8 GB Vengeance @1866 - Gigabyte Z87 UD3H - Corsair H100i - Samsung 120 GB EVO + Seagate 2 TB 7200rpm - Corsair TX850M - Fractal Arc Midi R2 - Logitech K120 Keyboard ($10) - ASUS VS239H-P 23-Inch Full HD LED IPS Monitor + BenQ T91W TN 900p 19" - HP PhotoSmart C4680 - Genius SP-S110 $12) - Rosewill N900PCE - Blue Snowball - Perixx MX-2000II- Audio Technica ATH-M30

 

#20 Dravic

Dravic

    VIA CPUs Fanboy

  • Banned
  • 1,717 posts

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:29 PM

How about working it backwards in order for the gou to kick out 60hz or fps at 1080p it must do the following
1920 x 1080= 2073600
Now multiply that by 3 since that is the number of sub pixels per pixel
=6220800

now multiply by 60 for 60fps
=373248000

So that is the number of bits the gpu must kick out if it is running 60 fps 1080p

Again this is probably wrong :P

 

 

:D


So... If Jesus had the gold, would he buy himself out instead of waiting 3 days for the respawn?

CPU: Phenom II x6 1045t ][ GPU: GeForce 9600GT 512mb DDR3 ][ Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-MA770T-UD3P ][ RAM: 2x4GB Kingston 1333MHz CL9 DDR3 ][ HDD: Western Digital Green 2TB ][ PSU: Chieftec 500AB A ][ Case: No-name without airflow or dust filters Budget saved for an upgrade so far: 2400PLN (600€) - Initial 2800PLN (700€) Upgraded already: CPU





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users